Marriott Hotels in Augusta Georgia - Not Honoring Reservations

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Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
1,912
3,507
113
To the OP, if you are gaming the system, please stop. There are so many people and companies who will be irretrievably hurt by this pandemic....you may be one of them. But it doesn't give you the right to take advantage of the chaos.
 
May 30, 2019
396
796
93
I can't think of a useful means to self-advocate this, nor can I think of a reason to want to support it.

If the OP booked one room at one hotel, he may have been able to make a case for himself, possibly through Marriott Elite Support. However, he booked enough room nights to qualify as a TA and look like a speculator. If Ryan pushes hard, Marriott could interpret his actions a T&C violation of some sort -- it doesn't matter which, Marriott will think of something -- and lose his status & points.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,067
23,018
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
I can't think of a useful means to self-advocate this, nor can I think of a reason to want to support it.

If the OP booked one room at one hotel, he may have been able to make a case for himself, possibly through Marriott Elite Support. However, he booked enough room nights to qualify as a TA and look like a speculator. If Ryan pushes hard, Marriott could interpret his actions a T&C violation of some sort -- it doesn't matter which, Marriott will think of something -- and lose his status & points.
And this can also be why Marriott did what they did- they can clearly see what he was doing since it was all done through his Elite number.

This is why we need honestly from people looking for assistance and why we need to ask the questions we ask.
 
Sep 19, 2015
5,581
8,362
113
49
If I was one of the few people left working at Marriott (massive furloughs, and CEO suspending his salary for the rest of the year, less sympathy for him than for the workers but at least he is setting an example) I would think that the OP is trying to game during the system during a pandemic. The reservation blitz started the day the Masters announced the postponement -- then multiple reservations even for overlapping dates -- ie Courtyard Augusta for November 7-16 and Fairfield Augusta for November 8 - 11. Continues on with many weeks in October and November.

At this time Marriott has implemented a very flexible cancellation policy up to 24 hours before reservation with no penalty even on the most restrictive rates.

Masters gets announced, and then OPs reservations for those particular dates gets cancelled. Now I suspect that the OP then cancelled all the other speculative bookings, ie October because there likely was no interest in actually going for anything but the Masters.

OP wants the reservation for the Masters period honored or to invoke the ultimate reservation guarantee -- where the hotel pays for the room for the traveler at another hotel and provides some compensation. The individual Marriott hotels, the elite team, and Marriott corporate have declined to honor the reservation or the guarantee. One look at the booking history my have been all that was needed to conclude that these were speculative bookings. The OP mentions being amongst "many others" and Marriott has no patience for this type of behavior.

OP then comes here and questions corporate behavior, asking how the consumer can have "faith" in their reservation... the hotel honoring contracts or commitments -- -- the hotel may be asking the same about their "titanium elite" members and speculative and bad faith bookings.

The OP wrote in post #1

Although I have yet to have a reasonable and satisfactory response, I will not stand idly by and allow the unauthorized cancellation of reservations, especially those with actions that are contrary to the guarantees provided, go without consequence.

Good luck with that. I would head Skippy's observation of the possible consequences of pushing this issue.
 
Apr 10, 2017
141
184
43
If I was one of the few people left working at Marriott (massive furloughs, and CEO suspending his salary for the rest of the year, less sympathy for him than for the workers but at least he is setting an example) I would think that the OP is trying to game during the system during a pandemic. The reservation blitz started the day the Masters announced the postponement -- then multiple reservations even for overlapping dates -- ie Courtyard Augusta for November 7-16 and Fairfield Augusta for November 8 - 11. Continues on with many weeks in October and November.

At this time Marriott has implemented a very flexible cancellation policy up to 24 hours before reservation with no penalty even on the most restrictive rates.

Masters gets announced, and then OPs reservations for those particular dates gets cancelled. Now I suspect that the OP then cancelled all the other speculative bookings, ie October because there likely was no interest in actually going for anything but the Masters.

OP wants the reservation for the Masters period honored or to invoke the ultimate reservation guarantee -- where the hotel pays for the room for the traveler at another hotel and provides some compensation. The individual Marriott hotels, the elite team, and Marriott corporate have declined to honor the reservation or the guarantee. One look at the booking history my have been all that was needed to conclude that these were speculative bookings. The OP mentions being amongst "many others" and Marriott has no patience for this type of behavior.

OP then comes here and questions corporate behavior, asking how the consumer can have "faith" in their reservation... the hotel honoring contracts or commitments -- -- the hotel may be asking the same about their "titanium elite" members and speculative and bad faith bookings.

The OP wrote in post #1

Although I have yet to have a reasonable and satisfactory response, I will not stand idly by and allow the unauthorized cancellation of reservations, especially those with actions that are contrary to the guarantees provided, go without consequence.

Good luck with that. I would head Skippy's observation of the possible consequences of pushing this issue.
Although this case is an extreme example of egregious behavior, I do not think that this is the only example of a member using the hard work of the people who do the research and otherwise assist those in need in order to obtain a result based upon their feeling of entitlement.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,067
23,018
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
Although this case is an extreme example of egregious behavior, I do not think that this is the only example of a member using the hard work of the people who do the research and otherwise assist those in need in order to obtain a result based upon their feeling of entitlement.
And not a case we would advocate.
 
May 16, 2016
34
111
33
52
I'm a professional event planner, and we see this in our industry all the time. We go to the trouble of negotiating a contract and booking a block of rooms at a specific price for our event attendees, and the sponsoring organization has a financial obligation to fill those rooms. Our contracts often include a "no lower rate" clause in them to ensure that attendees of our event and other groups cannot come in and book a bunch of rooms at a lower rate to "bypass" the group block. The Masters is what's known as a "citywide" event, which means any hotel that agrees to participate as a host property for a large event may not offer group rooms at lower rates than the rates negotiated by the event sponsor, and all rooms must be booked through the event sponsor so they can keep track of what's available at which participating properties. If a hotel doesn't allocate ALL of its available rooms to the event contract, they are allowed to sell those "leftover" rooms at any price they can get.

When an event has to be rescheduled, the hotel has an obligation to honor the terms of its original contract once they agree to the new dates. Very few events in any city are large enough to make this an issue, but Augusta isn't New York, New Orleans, San Francisco, or Boston, where even "citywide" events don't fill every hotel in town. With The Masters, you're talking about a huge influx of people into a fairly small geographic area with a relatively small number of hotels to serve them. And there's no way a hotel is going to honor individual reservations for $140/night (or whatever those rates were) when they have a guarantee to fill the same rooms at $250/night during a special event. The COVID-19 situation has completely upended the hotel and event industries. When things begin to open up again, transient travelers are going to find higher rates and lower availabilities across the spectrum of hotels that serve as host properties for large events that have been rescheduled, because hotels are going to prioritize customers who provide guaranteed revenue vs. those who book with points or those who book with flexible cancellation terms. That's just the reality of a business that depends on a day-to-day inflow of cash.

All of that said...I'm a lifetime Platinum member with Marriott, and it would never occur to me to try and take advantage of that status by speculatively booking a bunch of rooms that I plan to cancel. That's as rude as booking multiple dinner reservations and deciding where to go at the last minute. It's unfortunate that the OP's plan didn't work out as he expected, but that's what happens when you try to outsmart an industry that's seen every type of scam out there.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,067
23,018
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
I'm a professional event planner, and we see this in our industry all the time. We go to the trouble of negotiating a contract and booking a block of rooms at a specific price for our event attendees, and the sponsoring organization has a financial obligation to fill those rooms. Our contracts often include a "no lower rate" clause in them to ensure that attendees of our event and other groups cannot come in and book a bunch of rooms at a lower rate to "bypass" the group block. The Masters is what's known as a "citywide" event, which means any hotel that agrees to participate as a host property for a large event may not offer group rooms at lower rates than the rates negotiated by the event sponsor, and all rooms must be booked through the event sponsor so they can keep track of what's available at which participating properties. If a hotel doesn't allocate ALL of its available rooms to the event contract, they are allowed to sell those "leftover" rooms at any price they can get.

When an event has to be rescheduled, the hotel has an obligation to honor the terms of its original contract once they agree to the new dates. Very few events in any city are large enough to make this an issue, but Augusta isn't New York, New Orleans, San Francisco, or Boston, where even "citywide" events don't fill every hotel in town. With The Masters, you're talking about a huge influx of people into a fairly small geographic area with a relatively small number of hotels to serve them. And there's no way a hotel is going to honor individual reservations for $140/night (or whatever those rates were) when they have a guarantee to fill the same rooms at $250/night during a special event. The COVID-19 situation has completely upended the hotel and event industries. When things begin to open up again, transient travelers are going to find higher rates and lower availabilities across the spectrum of hotels that serve as host properties for large events that have been rescheduled, because hotels are going to prioritize customers who provide guaranteed revenue vs. those who book with points or those who book with flexible cancellation terms. That's just the reality of a business that depends on a day-to-day inflow of cash.

All of that said...I'm a lifetime Platinum member with Marriott, and it would never occur to me to try and take advantage of that status by speculatively booking a bunch of rooms that I plan to cancel. That's as rude as booking multiple dinner reservations and deciding where to go at the last minute. It's unfortunate that the OP's plan didn't work out as he expected, but that's what happens when you try to outsmart an industry that's seen every type of scam out there.
Thank you for the excellent insight.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
9,758
10,556
113
San Francisco
I'm a professional event planner, and we see this in our industry all the time. We go to the trouble of negotiating a contract and booking a block of rooms at a specific price for our event attendees, and the sponsoring organization has a financial obligation to fill those rooms. Our contracts often include a "no lower rate" clause in them to ensure that attendees of our event and other groups cannot come in and book a bunch of rooms at a lower rate to "bypass" the group block. The Masters is what's known as a "citywide" event, which means any hotel that agrees to participate as a host property for a large event may not offer group rooms at lower rates than the rates negotiated by the event sponsor, and all rooms must be booked through the event sponsor so they can keep track of what's available at which participating properties. If a hotel doesn't allocate ALL of its available rooms to the event contract, they are allowed to sell those "leftover" rooms at any price they can get.

When an event has to be rescheduled, the hotel has an obligation to honor the terms of its original contract once they agree to the new dates. Very few events in any city are large enough to make this an issue, but Augusta isn't New York, New Orleans, San Francisco, or Boston, where even "citywide" events don't fill every hotel in town. With The Masters, you're talking about a huge influx of people into a fairly small geographic area with a relatively small number of hotels to serve them. And there's no way a hotel is going to honor individual reservations for $140/night (or whatever those rates were) when they have a guarantee to fill the same rooms at $250/night during a special event. The COVID-19 situation has completely upended the hotel and event industries. When things begin to open up again, transient travelers are going to find higher rates and lower availabilities across the spectrum of hotels that serve as host properties for large events that have been rescheduled, because hotels are going to prioritize customers who provide guaranteed revenue vs. those who book with points or those who book with flexible cancellation terms. That's just the reality of a business that depends on a day-to-day inflow of cash.

All of that said...I'm a lifetime Platinum member with Marriott, and it would never occur to me to try and take advantage of that status by speculatively booking a bunch of rooms that I plan to cancel. That's he fas rude as booking multiple dinner reservations and deciding where to go at the last minute. It's unfortunate that the OP's plan didn't work out as he expected, but that's what happens when you try to outsmart an industry that's seen every type of scam out there.
Thank you for explaining the facts of life to our OP, Travelgirl. The rest of us knew it was unethical, but didn't know how to explain it. An excellent narrative on how things work in the event biz.
 
Apr 13, 2020
1
8
3
NE TN
I'm a professional event planner, and we see this in our industry all the time. We go to the trouble of negotiating a contract and booking a block of rooms at a specific price for our event attendees, and the sponsoring organization has a financial obligation to fill those rooms. Our contracts often include a "no lower rate" clause in them to ensure that attendees of our event and other groups cannot come in and book a bunch of rooms at a lower rate to "bypass" the group block. The Masters is what's known as a "citywide" event, which means any hotel that agrees to participate as a host property for a large event may not offer group rooms at lower rates than the rates negotiated by the event sponsor, and all rooms must be booked through the event sponsor so they can keep track of what's available at which participating properties. If a hotel doesn't allocate ALL of its available rooms to the event contract, they are allowed to sell those "leftover" rooms at any price they can get.

When an event has to be rescheduled, the hotel has an obligation to honor the terms of its original contract once they agree to the new dates. Very few events in any city are large enough to make this an issue, but Augusta isn't New York, New Orleans, San Francisco, or Boston, where even "citywide" events don't fill every hotel in town. With The Masters, you're talking about a huge influx of people into a fairly small geographic area with a relatively small number of hotels to serve them. And there's no way a hotel is going to honor individual reservations for $140/night (or whatever those rates were) when they have a guarantee to fill the same rooms at $250/night during a special event. The COVID-19 situation has completely upended the hotel and event industries. When things begin to open up again, transient travelers are going to find higher rates and lower availabilities across the spectrum of hotels that serve as host properties for large events that have been rescheduled, because hotels are going to prioritize customers who provide guaranteed revenue vs. those who book with points or those who book with flexible cancellation terms. That's just the reality of a business that depends on a day-to-day inflow of cash.

All of that said...I'm a lifetime Platinum member with Marriott, and it would never occur to me to try and take advantage of that status by speculatively booking a bunch of rooms that I plan to cancel. That's as rude as booking multiple dinner reservations and deciding where to go at the last minute. It's unfortunate that the OP's plan didn't work out as he expected, but that's what happens when you try to outsmart an industry that's seen every type of scam out there.
From the hotel side, as I read your response, you could not have explained it better.