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Paris for 10 euros a night — uh, make that 100 euros

Patrick Kerr books a hotel in Paris for the unbelievable rate of 10 euros a night. Turns out it's a mistake - the rate is off by a decimal point. His online agency promises a refund, but sends him a voucher, instead. What should Kerr do?

And the online travel agency with the most complaints is …

Expedia. That's according to a survey of my authoritative email "in" box, which contains seven years of complaint data from travelers. Coming in second? Travelocity, followed by Orbitz.

Can this trip be saved? No one told her about the flight restrictions for kids

Even though she did her best to ensure her 15-year-old grandson could make the flight from St. Louis to Fort Myers, Fla., things didn't quite work out for Victoria Horwitz-Denger. He ended up having to pay another $100 to fly down to Florida and bought a brand-new ticket to get home.

Rooms for $58 a night at the Ritz Carlton Chicago? No way!

When Jack Whalen found an unbelievable room rate of $58 a night at the Ritz-Carlton Chicago -- and on a holiday weekend, no less -- he was thrilled. "This was to have been an anniversary trip, and my wife would love to stay at a high end hotel at a great price," he says.

“The woman seemed mad that we had made the reservation through Travelocity”

It's a common problem with an uncommon resolution. Stephen Andrews accidentally typed his name as "Stehen" when he booked a package tour through Travelocity, and he thought a quick call to the airline might fix the problem. Unfortunately, it wasn't.

“It is a blatant ambush of personal credit card information”

The pop-up ad Kathy Agosta says she saw after finishing a reservation on Travelocity recently looked like a confirmation screen from the online travel agency, and it offered $20 cash back if she signed up for a service. Although she never shared her credit card information with the advertiser, she found a troubling connection.

No airline cookie conspiracy? What about this trail of crumbs?

Airlines and online travel agencies surreptitiously use computer "cookies" they've implanted on your Web browser to track your activity on their sites and then raise prices when it appears that you're interested in a fare. That's the rumor, at least.
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