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    Dinged for using a “fraudulent” discount code on my Avis rental

Dinged for using a “fraudulent” discount code on my Avis rental

Anand Iyer recently rented a Hyundai from Avis in Westfield, NJ. He’d found the car online through a site called […]

I have until Friday to cough up $14,000 – should I pay?

Given my backlog of cases, it's unusual to cover about something I just heard about a few hours ago. It's even more unusual to redact the name of both the passenger and the airline.

Why fake reviews don’t really matter

Don't believe everything you read online, especially on user-generated review websites such as TripAdvisor or Yelp, which claim to help you find the best hotels and restaurants.

Travel insurance claims can hinge on the tiniest details

When it comes to travel insurance claims, Hannah Yun was about as sure as anyone that hers would be successful. She was wrong.

Frequently asked questions about travel insurance

Travel insurance used to be a small segment of the insurance business that protected people against the loss of a non-refundable deposit on a big-ticket vacation such as a safari or a round-the-world cruise. But the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and a series of natural disasters in the early 2000s pushed it into the mainstream. Today, it's hard to find a travel agent or travel site that doesn't try to sell an optional insurance policy as part of a trip.

I paid $6,995 for a travel club membership — did I just get scammed?

Cathy Evans doesn't fit the profile of a typical scam victim. She's an account manager for a technology company in Boston, and she likes to think of herself as a discerning customer.

Can this trip be saved? Help, American Airlines wants $20,000!

Nancy Schmuhl thought she'd paid for her American Airlines tickets. But the airline had one last bill for her: A $20,000 invoice for "certain fraudulent bookings" she is alleged to have made.