A barking dog all the way across the Atlantic. How about a refund?

By | December 20th, 2016

After TJ McDonald upgraded his airline seat, he was looking forward to flying in comfort from Chicago to Warsaw, Poland. Instead, he spent his flight enduring a barking dog.

The subject of animals on airplanes is a highly controversial one. Many people would like to ban animals from the cabins of commercial flights.

After listening to the dog bark for nine hours, McDonald is among them. He wants a refund from LOT Polish Airlines as compensation for the lack of peace and quiet. But in seeking a refund of his upgrade, is McDonald barking up the wrong tree?

McDonald paid $350 to upgrade his flight on LOT to Premium Economy Class. After he took his seat, a couple boarded the plane and sat down behind him. They had a small dog with them, which was apparently not a service dog nor even an emotional-support animal. McDonald’s paper trail does not indicate whether the dog was in a carrier.

The dog barked without stopping as the flight taxied to the runway and took off, and continued barking for at least three-quarters of the flight. Although McDonald complained about the barking and other passengers were “making comments,” neither the owners nor the flight attendants did anything about it. McDonald had noise-canceling earphones, but they were of limited help. (He says he “didn’t complain often.”)

According to McDonald, the flight attendants were “very good.” He adds, “I know it wasn’t their decision to let the dog on.”

McDonald wrote to LOT’s customer service to request a refund for the upgrade. LOT’s response was “since no one else complained, they couldn’t do anything” for McDonald.

Related story:   Can I get a refund for an Airbnb rental in a ‘bad’ neighborhood?

At that point McDonald contacted our advocates, who directed McDonald to post about his case in our forum.

Our forum advocates suggested that McDonald write a letter to LOT’s executives and work his way up the corporate hierarchy, asking for reimbursement of the $350 upgrade fee. They also inferred that the change in cabin pressure hurt the dog’s ears and that its owners had failed to properly prepare the dog for the flight. But they indicated that this was a difficult situation for everyone on the plane, and the flight attendants couldn’t have done anything about the barking.

LOT’s conditions of carriage provide that

Carriage of dogs, cats and other pets requires the prior consent of the carrier. Such animals should be put in proper containers provided with food and accompanied by valid health and vaccination certificates, entry permits and other documents required by authorities of the country of destination and authorities of transit countries.


The conditions of carriage do not explicitly address any liability resulting from animals causing annoyance or harm to other passengers. But this provision concerning passenger conduct presumably applies to pet owners whose pets are annoying or harming other passengers or crew members:

If, in the view of the carrier, a passenger’s conduct on board the aircraft endangers the aircraft or any person or property on board, or makes it difficult for crew members to perform their duties, … or behaves in a manner to which other passengers may reasonably object, the carrier must take such reasonable measures as it deems necessary to prevent continuation of such conduct, including means of constraint, removal of the passenger from the aircraft after landing and refusal of onward carriage or future carriages of the passenger. In order to ensure the safety of the flight as well as safety and order on board the aircraft, the aircraft commander shall be entitled to issue instructions to all persons on board the aircraft, and all persons on board the aircraft are obliged to comply with instructions of the commander. The carrier reserves the right to pursue claims against any passenger who caused damage to another passenger or the carrier.

As for a refund, the conditions indicate that

If the passenger wishes a refund on his/her ticket for reasons other than those set out in par. 11.3 of this Article, and the applied tariff does not exclude the right to a refund, the amount of the refund shall be:

If a portion of the ticket has been used and the fare conditions allow for this, the refund shall be the amount equal to the difference between the fare paid and the fare applied for the route travelled on the basis of the ticket presented for refund, decreased, as the case may be, by any cancellation fees resulting from the use of the given special fare or a handling fee charged for refunds, if such fee is applicable …

Unfortunately, this wording doesn’t make clear whether not McDonald could expect a refund. But some compensation for having to sit in front of a barking dog for nine hours seems reasonable – regardless of whether any other passengers complained. That’s not an appropriate standard for any company to use in deciding whether a customer has a valid complaint.

Our advocates are wondering if they should reach out to LOT on McDonald’s behalf. Can McDonald hope for any compensation for having to listen to the barking for nine hours? And does “no one else complaining” absolve LOT of any responsibility for the situation? If they reach out, will they be chasing their own tails?

Should we take TJ McDonald's case?

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  • Annie M

    I say take the case but not if he wants a full refund. He got to where he was going and LOT delivered the service they were paid to.

    A partial refund or credit for a future trip is reasonable not not a full refund.

  • Rebecca

    He wants a refund of the upgrade fee. I agree that seems reasonable.

  • Rebecca

    Small dogs don’t bark. They yip.

    I like dogs; I have a large dog that has moved across the country with us twice. I know other people feel differently, and they’re entitled to their opinion. But I can’t stand little dogs, especially when they’re yipping. That noise just makes me want to pull my hair out. They run and bounce along and yip their brains out. I avoid people’s homes if they have a yippy dog.

  • Hanope

    I dislike the claim that he shouldn’t get compensation because other people didn’t complain. Since when is that the basis for whether an airline failed to act properly, because other people didn’t know how to complain, or didn’t feel like it? That’s a poor excuse.

  • Lindabator

    could mean that he is a habitual complainer – I know quite a few – they ALWAYS complain. SO if the airline heard from no one else, they may have reached the conclusion he just wanted to complain

  • greg watson

    First of all, who believes that ‘no one else complained’ ? And, how could we prove that this was a fact. Secondly, it sounds as if their regulations apply to pet’s stowed in the cargo area, as opposed to being in the cabin, & I didn’t read anything about support animals in their rules. A refund of at least the cost of the upgrade is due this OP ( & if you have ever had to travel for a long period, with, say an abscessed tooth, for example ) he is due further compensation, like a perfect pair of sound muting headphones, or
    travel vouchers. Shame on the airline for trying to minimize this situation !

  • greg watson

    Never would have thought of that,……………….wouldn’t want people to think that I was gullible……………………….do you really believe that only 1 person complained ??

  • Bill___A

    “no one else complaining” is a lame excuse. Did the situation exist or did it not? That is the question, and I suspect it did. The reason people pay for upgrades is to get more comfort and if a yappy dog that the airline let on the plane ruins it, the airline should pay. They should get back their upgrade fee plus more compensation for the inconvenience. It would have made things uncomfortable for their arrival too.

  • Bill___A

    That would not be my first assumption, nor my second or third. I’m pretty sure that once they are sitting there, thinking how they paid extra money for a better experience, that this was just plain wrong. It really grinds on you when you pay an upgrade fee and it is worse. I’ve never claimed money back from an airline but I can think of times when I should have…

  • Lindabator

    happens all too often

  • Lindabator

    but the airlines are not his MINDREADERS – and if only one complaint comes in….

  • Dutchess

    How is a dog barking any more worthy of compensation than a baby crying or a yappy seatmate?

  • PsyGuy

    Because the PAX shouldn’t have had the dog in the cabin under the conditions described.

  • PsyGuy

    Well the LW would be able to observe if other passengers complained to the FA.

  • There are more options for control. A baby doesn’t have to stay in a carrier, can suck on a bottle, be walked around, and there is even baby Benadryl. Yappy seat mates are even easier. You tell them to keep it down. If they are really disruptive the FA has authority to intervene.

  • BubbaJoe123

    1. Babies are people. Pets are not.
    2. Yappy seatmates can be asked to leave you alone.

  • PsyGuy

    $200/$250 in airline script is appropriate

  • PsyGuy

    He still had a better seat though, more leg room and what not.

  • PsyGuy

    Isn’t baby Benadryl just Benadryl that’s been watered down?

  • AAGK

    “Apparently not a service dog or emotional support animal.” How could the OP possibly know that? It’s not relevant anyway if a dog of that size was permitted in the cabin. Sitting next to barking dogs, crying babies and people who who spread out over armrests and into aisles is annoying. The solution is probably cost prohibitive for the avg person.

  • AAGK

    What condition? The airline permitted the animal in the cabin. Pax probably had emotional support docs.

  • MarkKelling

    Sounds like perfectly normal cabin conditions to me. What conditions exactly existed that should have prohibited the dog from being there? Most airlines allow small dogs and cats to travel with you in the cabin as long as they are in a carrier so they can’t run wild and you pay the fee which in many cases is more than the cost of a seat.

  • AAGK

    Why isn’t whether anyone else complained a helpful indicator of nuisance? I wouldn’t bother with this case as it’s a customer request for extras that the OP can ask for himself.

  • MarkKelling

    And what, exactly, is the FA to do when your plane is at 30K feet over the Atlantic? Open the door and throw the dog out if it barks too much?

  • Annie M

    It could be that it never occurred to anyone else to take it any further. If I had to listen to a dog all the way home, even I would want some compensation.

  • Dutchess

    Why? People are allowed to travel with pets. My mother as a matter of routine travels with her little dog in a carrier whenever she can. There’s no rule that a dog MUST be a service dog to be allowed on a plane.

  • Dutchess

    Right, but both are outside of your control. A colicy unhappy baby is not easily pacified. Point 2, you’re going to ask two people having a conversation next to you to be quiet? You would be fun at parties.

  • BubbaJoe123

    For #1, it’s out of your control, but a baby, being a person, gets a much higher degree of consideration than a pet.

    For #2, I presumed you were talking about a seatmate who’s trying to talk with you. If you’re in the aisle, and the window and middle are talking, you’re unlikely to hear that much of them. If they’re speaking too loudly, people can be asked to keep their voices down.

  • PsyGuy

    In a carrier is the operative word, and pets are traveled in the cabin at the discretion of the flight crew.

  • PsyGuy

    Disembark the dog before departure, or kick the PAX and their dog off the flight. Doggy Benadryl.

  • PsyGuy

    Peace and Quiet, and they are allowed at the discretion of the flight crew.

  • PsyGuy

    The LW stated this animal was not an ESA.

  • Rebecca

    Not that I disagree. Normally I side against the OP in cases like these. Personally, I just can’t stand little dogs. I’ve had several bad experiences with them. I know there are folks with well trained small dogs, but that’s the exception and not the rule. The family of my high school boyfriend had this obnoxious Westie that would start running up and down the furniture, hopping along the tops of the couches and chairs, yipping incessantly at every possible time you simply wouldn’t want to be bothered by a dog. And most of the people I know with small dogs let them get away with everything because they’re small dogs. Again, not every small dog owner on the planet, just my personal experience.

    I have a 100lb black lab-bernese mountain dog. Things little dogs can get away with, my dog can’t just simply due to his size. When he barks, he sounds really mean. He’s not, he’s well trained and friendly. But he sounds even bigger than he is. He also doubles as a vacuum, picking up pretty much anything my toddlers drop on the floor. I am just a big dog person, I guess.

  • fairmont1955

    I can’t stand little children, who also cry and can’t be controlled, either. If dogs were that easy to make stop barking, then no dog would bark.

    Much like you can get stuck sitting near a child, a smelly person, someone who won’t stop talking loudly, etc., I think this is a random reason to demand money back.

  • Rebecca

    Not that I necessarily believe the airline is responsible. But there’s a difference. A baby genuinely can’t help it. (I mean an infant. Certainly some infants – not mine, I’m very lucky – have hours long fits of crying and can’t be consoled. Colic, by definition, is a baby that cries longer than 3 hours a day, 3 times per week, that can’t be consoled by anyone. This was very helpful for me when my kids were little babies and 10 or 15 minutes once in a while seemed awful. Some parents have it way worse. Although, seeing that, I would make the argument that a baby with colic shouldn’t be on a flight.)

    A dog owner should absolutely be able to control their dog. This includes incessant barking. My dog would never bark nonstop. I would stop him. The problem is really irresponsible pet owners.

  • fairmont1955

    Having a toothache has nothing to do with a barking animal as an example. I’ve had to deal with obnoxious children who won’t shut up or kick and get in the way, running around – that disruption is more like a dog that barks. It happens and it doesn’t mean you get money back because it annoys you.

  • fairmont1955

    Dogs can still bark if they are in a carrier (crazy but true!). I just had a meowing cat on my flight this weekend, from inside a carrier.
    Besides, he admitted he can’t verify if it was in a carrier.

  • Rebecca

    If you are powerless to stop your dog from incessantly barking, you shouldn’t have a dog. My dog barks to alert us if someone is in the yard/coming to the door, for example. But once I tell him it’s ok, he stops.

  • fairmont1955

    To you, they get higher degree of consideration. I’m not giving you special rights because you opted to have an obnoxious kid I don’t want to have to deal with.

  • Rebecca

    A baby with colic is actually medically defined. It is a baby that cries more than 3 hours a day, more than 3 times a week. I would make the argument that if your baby has colic, you shouldn’t be on a flight. I have a one and two year old. They’re both relatively good fliers. But if they were sick or had colic as infants, I wouldn’t put them on an airplane.

  • renae

    While I love dogs, putting up with one barking all across the ocean would drive me crazy. HOWEVER, I have had to put up with wailing/unruly brats (in First Class) all the way across the Pacific. I couldn’t get a refund for that either…..and there were NUMEROUS complaints.
    Give him credit for a future upgrade.

  • BubbaJoe123

    They get consideration because they’re people. People get more consideration than pets. I certainly agree it’s incumbent on parents to do everything possible on planes to keep their children from disturbing other passengers. I’ve been on both sides of that coin.

  • PsyGuy

    I’m a cat guy, cats don’t excited about anything. Strange human in the room, meh. Food on the floor, maybe I’ll sniff it later, then again maybe not, probably isn’t worth my time.

  • BubbaJoe123

    “Disembark the dog before departure, or kick the PAX and their dog off the flight. Doggy Benadryl.”

    Again, once the plane has taken off, you can’t deboard the dog. Unless you’re talking about diverting the flight, which would be crazy.

  • Dutchess

    Either way it comes down to a HUMAN that’s responsible. You ask a person to quiet down…you ask a person to quiet their baby down….you ask a person to quiet their dog down. I don’t see the difference.

  • Dutchess

    Yes, drugging fussy babies….that’s the solution!!

  • Dutchess

    How exactly would the LW know if it was or wasn’t a service animal? I’m not saying it was or wasn’t but the LW had no way of knowing one way or another. There’s no law requiring service animals to wear any specially identification as a service animal.

  • BubbaJoe123

    Because the airline can entirely reasonably choose to not transport pets in the cabin. It can’t reasonably choose to not transport humans.

  • greg watson

    you HAVE read Gullible’s Travels, haven’t you

  • greg watson

    could not disagree with you more…………..children are with adults who are responsible for them & if their children were running around in an airplane & couldn’t be controlled, they would be on that airlines ‘no fly list’ very soon. Apparently the dog was not or could not be controlled & it should be on the ‘no fly’ list too. Believe it or not, anyone near enough to hear a dog yapping for 9 hours would be very p___ed off. For the record, he just wanted a refund for the ‘upgrade’, not for the whole flight. I hope you ‘saints’ get to experience the same type of thing sometime, & it more than annoys you.

  • Bill___A

    Because it isn’t. Many people never complain, that doesn’t mean they are not annoyed. Some of these people, by making an issue about it, make things easier in the long run for the rest of us.

  • Bill___A

    It would certainly solve the problem and it would provide an incentive for dog owners to be a lot more pro-active about barking…

  • Bill___A

    If I complain about something, it is because it is a problem and I am certainly not going to accept that “no one else complained” means I’m a liar. Not that I have ever actually complained about something like that, but still…

  • Bill___A

    They have these things called barking control collars. The dog barks, it gives a beep and then zaps him, he does the chicken. After a couple of those, the beep is generally all that’s required to remind him to shut up.

  • Rebecca

    I had a cat for almost 15 years, that I got as a kitten in college. Alice was awesome, absolutely not replaceable.

    However, we decided on a “no animals that poop in the house” policy when we had kids. Similar to my mom’s “no rodents, even if they’re cute” policy when I was a kid. I just don’t want a litter box, there’s no good place to put it. And after living next door to an elderly woman who allowed her strung out daughter and just-out-of-prison boyfriend to move in, and having to call the police several times because they shot other neighbors animals (and wild animals, for that matter) with pellet guns (the kids and the drunk boyfriend I mean), I vowed to never have an outdoor cat. Also, multiple police reports IS grounds to break a lease, in case you were wondering. Several other incidents as well, but that was a recurring one.

  • MarkKelling

    doggy downers would probably work.

    just like benadryl for screaming children.

  • MarkKelling

    A barking dog, to me , is less annoying than a screaming child. And I classify them about the same for the nuisance factor. Both can be controlled with proper preparation, unfortunately neither are controlled in many situation by their owners.

  • PsyGuy

    My cat doesn’t have a litter box he just goes outside

  • PsyGuy

    I agree.

  • AAGK

    It’s still a data point. This guy didn’t complain either, he just asked for compensation. Most people just move on. He said the dog barked the most pre takeoff. Unfortunately he didn’t ask for a different seat then.

  • MarkKelling

    Do you travel with the dog on airplanes? Well behaved animals (and children) sometimes are overwhelmed by the new experience of flying. There are more than 100 strangers on a plane. Dog gets confused over who to bark at and who not even when he is told multiple times it is OK. Your perfectly behaved pet (Don’t mean yours specifically) freaks and everyone hates you for bringing your pet. Fortunately most do behave after they get used to the environment, unfortunately that might take multiple flights. For me, a barking dog (not a yappy or whiny one) is relaxing and I really don’t mind it.

  • Bill___A

    I expect people to take me seriously and if they give an answer like that, they aren’t taking me seriously, which is ALWAYS going to make it into one heck of a lot bigger problem than it was. Data point or not.

  • Bill___A

    Barking dogs do not belong on planes. That’s what kennels are for. Noisy children are generally a result of poor parenting, which is a difficult issue to combat also. I agree both are annoying. However, I think they should be very quick to toss a barking dog off the plane without hesitation. No one needs to or should have to put up with that.

  • Don Spilky

    Non US airline and he was in the class of seat he paid for. Agreed, super annoying but I think you would be barking up the wrong tree in this pursuit ;)

  • Chris_In_NC

    I’m sympathetic, but if you replace “dog” with “baby” would you still feel the same way? There is a simple $1 solution here…. ear plugs

  • Rebecca

    He has only flown once, when we moved. And he flew as cargo. It was actually more expensive for the dogs ticket than my husband and mine combined. And he needed a special $300 crate, because he’s so large. When we travel, we are lucky to live near a town with a major university. So we have a pet sitter that normally lives with her parents come stay at our house. It’s a win/win. The dog doesn’t get stressed being in a kennel, the college student gets to live away from her parents for a week(ish). This is something I’d recommend to anyone if they know a responsible college student; in our case it’s a coworkers child.

  • 42NYC

    I dont like barking dogs on a plane but fail to see where this is the airline’s fault.

  • The Original Joe S

    Because the let the dog get on the airplane.

  • The Original Joe S

    Good idea! Dope them up!

    My mom had these nasty people next door who let the dog bark, purposely. Doc gave my mom tranks. She gave ’em to the dog, in a nice meatball. Doggie always came over to the fence for his meatball, and then it was DOWNER time. Ha ha ha!

  • The Original Joe S

    good idea! They should put “torpedo tubes” in the airplane for just these types of dogs, animals, and disruptive passengers!

  • The Original Joe S

    go down to angels 10, open the door, and shove him out! With his owner.

  • The Original Joe S

    Duct tape.

  • The Original Joe S

    I have low expectations, and am happy when they are exceeded. I bring eats for munching. I have noise-cancelling earphones. I take my hearing aids out.

  • 42NYC

    do we know if this is a ‘therapy dog’ or someone’s pet? If its a therapy dog (using that term loosely) the airline cant do anything. If its just a pet, how is this worse than a baby who screams the entire flight? (i’m pro baby on flight, but a crying baby can be just as loud)

  • naoma

    Horrible story. Husband is allergic to dogs and he would have had a fit had a dog been on the plane, much less “BARKING.

  • cscasi

    That is till one complain t too many; especially if the dog kept that up for hours. But, perhaps in today’s “politically correct” world, one is not supposed to complain.
    Nonetheless, I certainly would have made my comments to the airline; in hopes they would look at that and think about other passengers’ comfort when things like this happen. The airlines do not know unless complaints are made and I would not consider this one as trivial. As for whether this person is a constant complainer, I have no idea.

  • cscasi

    Could just as well be that he is not a habitual complainer; probably more so.

  • joycexyz

    Suppose this were a whiny or crying child? Sometimes the best efforts of the parents are of no avail. This could be the same with the dog. Self defense–really good noise-cancelling headphones or earplugs.

  • jae1

    Those are training collars, not intended for full-time wear. It is in fact cruel to leave any type of training collar on a dog all the time.

  • jae1

    Depending on the length of the flight, it may not have been safe to tranquilize the dog. Dosing for small dogs is often tricky. It’s neither legal nor funny to medicate someone else’s pet. You have no way of knowing what that animal’s medical needs are, and you may well be giving it something that it ought not to be taking.

  • jae1

    On most airlines people are allowed to bring small animals on board, regardless of their status as service or support animals. The regulations quoted in the post simply don’t address them. Generally there’s a limit of no more than 2 animals total in the cabin. This one dog likely was allowed under such regulations. Some dogs bark–while the owners should have tried to keep the dog quiet, that’s not always possible. One hopes that this was their first time flying with him/her, and now they know their dog is a bad traveler.

  • Tim Mengelkoch

    you can’t very well leave a baby at home but you can kennel a dog

  • Tim Mengelkoch

    good zinger

  • Tim Mengelkoch

    bark control collars are very effective

  • Tim Mengelkoch

    There are also calming chews and sprays for dogs and loud meowing cats

  • AAGK

    That’s a really good reply. I don’t know what to say now. I can see why you are effective though.

  • The Original Joe S

    then the mutt will stop barking. Good!

  • pauletteb

    I think the forum member who noted that the air pressure change might have hurt the dog’s ears has a good point. What could the owner do in that case? Much like the parent of an infant crying because his/her ears hurt, the dog owner would be basically helpless.

  • Asiansm Dan

    Flying therapy animals are scams to me. They want to save money because it’s very expensive to leave them home or fly them in cargo.

  • Mel65

    I wasn’t aware that “BARKING” was medically proven to aggravate allergies.

  • greg watson

    yes, he could take a head count & include it in his request ! Really ??

  • greg watson

    One more time ! Who really believes that no one else complained ? Would the real ‘saints’, stand up and be counted !

  • fairmont1955

    For some dogs. The discomfort can often times cause more stress for the dog, and for some dogs the buzz isn’t strong enough. Training professionals also don’t advocate harming the dog as a method to control them, as that causes stress of fear which can then cause more acting out.
    Anyway, if you wouldn’t put it on a crying baby, don’t put one on an animal.

  • fairmont1955

    And yet many adults and parents do a crap job of managing their kids, so given that I have spent many, many hours trapped on planes with misbehaving/screaming children, I’m probably used to understanding that not everything can be controlled.
    Fun fact: children running on a plan isn’t the same as a screaming child. You can restrain a kid but that doesn’t make them quiet.
    Anyway, given you being overly sensitive on the subject, I’m sorry you can’t understand that in fact you cannot force a dog to stop barking, so please don’t ever get one.

  • fairmont1955

    Much like if you are powerless to get your child to stop crying you shouldn’t have one, right? It’s that easy for everything :)

  • Harvey-6-3.5

    And I feel sorry for the passengers on their return flight.

  • JewelEyed

    Frankly, unlike children, you can crate an animal up and put it in the cargo hold. If a dog is flying in the cabin, it should be required that the owner have a crate for the animal placed in the hold. If the animal can’t behave, it needs to be place in the crate and the crate in the hold for the duration of the flight. There you go.

  • JewelEyed

    Because an actual service dog or emotional support animal is meant to behave with a certain amount of manners and restraint? Barking the whole flight makes it clear that’s not the case.

  • JewelEyed

    Ear plugs are not magic. Unless your hearing is terrible, you won’t magically be deaf after putting them in.

  • JewelEyed

    Technically, you can leave a baby with someone else…

  • Nathan Witt

    I’m pretty pro-consumer, but it’s hard for me to side with customers who expect any business to compensate them for the bad behavior of other customers. It might have been against the rules for that particular dog to have been on the plane (although then Christopher would have an angry letter from the dog’s owner demanding compensation for denied boarding with their “service” animal), but the bottom line is that LOT didn’t do anything wrong to this customer or violate their terms of service. You aren’t guaranteed a quiet flight, etc., and while it would be nice if all your fellow travelers were always clean, small, quiet, etc., the reality is that you’re on public transportation with other members of the public.

  • Perhaps the airlines should keep a couple of those collars on each plane.

    One for a dog, and one for those loud, obnoxious folk!

  • Rebecca

    I get the joke. I’m honestly not one of those parents, I swear. I remember not having kids. I understand other people can’t just tune them out.

    But, a dog is legally a piece of property. Have to control your own property. I love my dog. But those people that say their dog is like their child make me batty. I would gladly throw my dog or their dog in front of a moving train if it was to save my child. Or anyone else’s for that matter. Just not equatable.

  • fairmont1955

    If you opt to reduce an animal to a piece of property because, you know, the law is OK with it, that shows more about how you treat living things than anything else.

    And using a false equivalency of a life-or-death choice isn’t valid; not wanting to hear a barking dog (or screaming kid) on a plane is literally not remotely similar since there should be no threat of death while flying.

  • Rebecca

    I was just making the point that a human being is simply not the same as an animal. I wasn’t implying any equivalency. It was only to make the point that the people that tell me their dogs are like their children – and really believe that, honestly believe it – make me nuts.

    And animals are property. The law treats them as such. I was making a comparison, not saying I actually treat animals like a toaster.

  • naoma

    i DISLIKE DOGS. MY HUSBAND IS ALLERGIC TO THEM. WE WERE NICELY SEATED AND A PERSON CAME ON WITH A BIG DOG — NOT A SERVICE DOG. HUSBAND TOLD FLIGHT ATTENDANT OF HIS ALLERGIES AND CO-PILOT SAID WE HAD TO LEAVE THE PLANE. WE GOT ANOTHER PLANE — BEST PART IS THE ONE WE GOT ON ARRIVED HOME BEFORE THE DOG PLANE DID. I DO NOT LIKE DOGS. THEY SMELL AWFUL. I SAY “BAN DOGS ON PLANES.” iF YOU NEED THEM FOR “COMFORT” JUST STAY HOME.

  • naoma

    So sad you can”t stand children. We have a wonderful daughter — now an adult who went to Oxford on a scholarship. She is married and wants no children.. No problem. She was never spanked nor slapped as a child and tells us she never met anyone who had such a wonderful childhood.

  • LonnieC

    I can imagine only a few things worse than listening to a barking dog for hours on end while trapped in an aluminum tube. Certainly, a fair compensation would be the refund of the amount the OP paid for the express purpose of better enjoying his flight. LOT got hm to where he wanted to go, therefore the basic ticket promise was kept. However, the additional promise – a more comfortable and pleasant ride – was not. LOT owes the OP a refund.

  • LonnieC

    (He probably had a more comfortable ride….)

  • LonnieC

    I absolutely love this (and we’ve had a cat)…

  • LonnieC

    Probably should have gotten a litter box for the boyfriend….

  • fairmont1955

    Congrats, glad you are so pleased with yourself :) Cheers!

  • fairmont1955

    Nothing sad about it! I get there’s people who are most comfortable with traditional views of what they want out of life, and if that works for them great. Not all of us want the same cookie cutter experience.

  • greg watson

    I’m not really sensitive, & I have had a couple of dogs. Would not risk them being an annoyance on a public carrier though…………..that’s called common decency & consideration for others…………….as for children, they are not usually allowed to run around on a plane………….are they ? Like it or not, the parents are responsible for their behaviour & if they were terrors, I would put them on a ‘no fly’ list

  • Maria K. Telegdy

    I traveled on QANTAS from LA to Auckland NZ, behind me was a father with 2 boys (both under 10 years of age. The kid behind me was kicking the back of my seat incessantly, I looked back at the father several times, and asked him to stop hus kid from kicking my seat. No resolution was taken. I talked to the flight attendant, she asked the father to stop the kid from kicking. NOTHING, and from LA to Auckland NZ, is 12.5 hrs to fly. I made sure ever since, to have an ISLE seat, and if kicking happens I just get up, and sooner of later the problem will be taken care of usually by a flight attendant, in rare cases the captain has to step in.

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