Are airlines lying about boarding pass fees?

By | July 31st, 2012

When Marius Vogelfanger got an email from Ryanair before a recent flight from Bergamo Airport, near Milan, Italy, he thought it was sending it to him as a courtesy.

“Don’t forget to check-in on line from 15 days up to 4 hours prior to your scheduled flight departure,” it said.

But the email failed to tell Vogelfanger, a construction professional who works in Washington, what would happen if he and his travel companion failed to check in online.

When they arrived at the airport, they were given some bad news by an airline representative: They’d have to print out their boarding passes, and it would cost them.

“We were told to go to the cashier and pay 120 euro for the printing of two boarding passes,” he says. “We paid this outrageous amount since we had no choice. We had to be on that flight.”

Sixty euro ($72) to print out a boarding pass? What are they smoking at Ryanair?

Before I get to the answer, here’s the sad truth: The boarding pass fee isn’t new, although many passengers like Vogelfanger will experience it for the first time this summer. The discount airline quietly added the fee late last year. Spirit Air charges a more modest $5 to print a boarding pass and $1 to use its electronic kiosks at the airport.

What’s new is that this funny airline math is leading to windfall profits. For example, when Spirit Air reported its latest quarterly numbers, it noted that the average base ticket revenue per passenger flight segment slipped 1.1 percent to $81. But at the same time, the average non-ticket revenue jumped 18.6 percent to $51 per passenger flight segment.

Related story:   Is the TSA coming for your iPad?

In other words, the average Spirit ticket costs $81, but the average passenger also pays $51 in fees, including, at times, the silly print-a-boarding-pass fee.

These so-called “ancillary” fees are big business for the airline industry. A recent survey found that worldwide, the airline industry collected $22.6 billion in ancillary revenues last year, up 66 percent from two years ago.

If you’re a laissez-faire free marketer, you’re probably saying to yourself: “Isn’t that great? The airline industry has finally figured out a way to make money?”

Not so fast. I’m a believer in the free market, too, but there’s a right way and a wrong way to do it.

And not telling Vogelfanger he’ll have to shell out another $72 to print out a boarding pass — that’s the wrong way. But when he complained to Ryanair, it said it would keep his money, thanks very much, even though he’d paid more for the passes than for the original ticket.

I’ll say it again. The boarding passes cost more than the ticket.

“The answer was that we didn’t follow their policy and therefore no refund is granted, nor any explanation or apology,” he says.

Granted, Ryanair discloses the boarding pass printout fees on its website, as does Spirit. But who has the time to surf the Internet, pre-flight? Ryanair and airlines like it, know that. They’re profiting from it.



  • emanon256

    And I thought the Spirit charges were bad, that is just ridiculous. But come on, Spirit and Ryan Air offer rock bottom prices, they are often over $100 less than the competition. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, the cheap always comes out more expensive. I don’t know why people continue to think these bargain airlines are really saving them money.

    But who has the time to surf the Internet, pre-flight?

    I am sorry, but I think consumers need to do a little more due diligence when choosing a business. Would you drop your kid off at a daycare without researching it first? Probably not. So why fly an airline without researching it first? With the internet, this only takes a few minutes. Much less time than researching a day care. I think they airlines are only doing this because people don’t take the time to read. Just read, and then make an informed decision. I don’t agree with the fees, so I make sure I am aware, and vote with my wallet. I don’t think anyone is lying.

  • SoBeSparky

    If consumers think they have the skills to search on their own for the lowest cost flight, and then buy it on line without refunds, then they have the obligation to also search for the reputation of the lowest cost airline.

    (We do not know where this boarding pass fee was revealed to the purchaser. I am sure the EU has disclosure requirements which were not noted in the complaint. In the US, all those fees are revealed, although sometimes after considerable reading.)

    Would you buy a car on line without researching user reports? Or buy a book without reading reviews, and that is just a $10 or $20 purchase?

    Lazy, “just the low price” shoppers are to blame. Use a travel agent next time if you feel you were “scammed.” The suckers obviously do not have the skills to do your own booking.

  • emanon256

    Right on the main Ryanair page there is a link that says for info on fees click here. I clicked it and it lists the airport boarding pass fee as 60EU if booked via the call center or at an airport, and free if booked on-line. It also has a big link that says “How do I avoid paying optional fees” and one of the first things it says is: “Airport Boarding Card Re-issue Fee – is avoidable by simply presenting your online boarding pass at your departure airport.” I did not bold it, it is bold on the screen. That took me less than 1 minute.

    I don’t like the survey. It appears that the airlines are adequately disclosing the fees, people just aren’t reading them. And of course these fees are more than the cost involved, that doesn’t make it a scam. If I only charged my clients my actual costs, I wouldn’t make any money and couldn’t pay my mortgage. I think the prices are excessive, but it is not a scam, and they can be avoidable by spending 1 minute reading.

  • Raven_Altosk

    Airlines are out of control with the fees, but that’s what the average Joe (read: leisure) flier wants. They surf sites like Cheapoair, Expedia, Priceline, Orbitz and the other ilk looking to save a few bucks. Then, when they get to the airport, the airlines make the REAL money–baggage fees, rebooking fees, extra legroom, snacks, etc.

    Personally, I’d rather pay a little extra money for better service and comfort. But since I’m the minority out there, we’ll continue to see stories about how someone’s non-refundable ticket should be refundable because (insert idiotic reason and/or heartstrings pull here).

    Perhaps the worst example of customer stupidity and fees was the woman who “lived” at the airport in California and then wanted to sue USAirways after she scammed a church for the cash she needed. Anyone know what happened with that crazy lady?

  • The problem (one of the many) with the story’s analysis is that it fails to appreciate the difference between a super low cost airline such as Ryanair, which charges for you for everything except the air you breathe, (but that’s coming soon) and more traditional airlines which bundle more items but charge a higher price.

    For example, the article complains that a ticket on Spirit generally rus $81, but you pay $51 in fees. Well, the obvious question is, how much does an average ticket cost on other airlines with different business models. If other airlines average over $132, then the consumer has come out ahead. Who cares how the numbers are broken out as long as there is full and adequate disclosure.

    The article also fails to disclose how much fees are paid by passengers on other airlines. For example, on most American carrier, a passenger with two bags will pay $50+ in baggage fees alone.

    This is not an issue of free market, although how dare a business charge more for a service that it costs to provide? Profit is evil. Having said that, there is a difference between profit and profiteering. Charging $72 to print a boarding pass at the airport, where the passengers options are limited crosses the line, at least in my mind, into profiteering. This is doubly true as kiosks represent money savings to an airline. Its akin for the bank charging you to use its own ATM machines.

  • I don’t know why people continue to think these bargain airlines are really saving them money.
    —————————————
    Because they can as long as you know the rules so that you can make an apple to apples comparison. I happened to be in Los Angeles when a buddy of mine was in Vegas. With only a couple days notice, he flew down to hang out. The ticket cost $28 each way. He had flown Spirit before and knew to take a small carryon the kind that fits under the seat and to print out his boarding pass. The price was less than half what every other airline charged.

    If you don’t know the rules then you will pay $72 to print out your boarding pass. Know the rules, save money.

  • MarkKelling

    There are banks that charge you to use their ATMs and for the privilege of simply having one of their ATM cards even if you don’t use it. I stay away from those banks. I also stay away from the airlines with the (in my opinion) outrageous fees. With all of the mergers in both banking and airlines it is becoming more difficult to find one of either that I like more than others, but I choose the ones that offer the best service with the least fees even if the base product might cost a few dollars more.

  • That’s insane. That said, who in this day and age just shows up at the airport with no paperwork?

    On the flip side, is RyanAir charging this ridiculously high fee to 1) speed up the check-in process, 2) minimize the staff required to check-in or 3) make money off of nimwits?

  • MarkKelling

    While I agree that a single boarding pass does not cost $72 or even $5 to print at the airport, it does cost the airlines money to buy the machines, install them and keep them running. If they want to charge to print something at the airport it is their choice as long as they do have some way for the passengers to not have to pay. I have nothing against an airline trying to make a profit. I would prefer they just charge a passenger what it costs (plus the profit they want) for a ticket in one lump sum instead of having a hundred different fees where I am not really sure how much I will be paying.

    I believe the airlines have forgotten how much those machines are saving them because they don’t have to have an equivalent number of people standing at the counters. Machines don’t take sick days or need bathroom or lunch breaks or misunderstand you when you want Oakland and they thought you meant Auckland and they don’t have a surly attitude because a previous customer upset them.

  • frostysnowman

    4) all of the above

  • johnb78

    I’m flying to Dublin from London next month on British Airways. GBP28/$40ish return. Tea, coffee, luggage, air, checkin, etc, all included. Budget airlines are for suckers.

  • cjr001

    “What are they smoking at Ryanair?”

    BS. Complete And Utter Brand BS.

  • cjr001

    “it does cost the airlines money to buy the machines, install them and keep them running”

    Apparently the concept of “the cost of doing business” has also gone the way of the dodo.

  • ajt49

    For my sins, I will be travelling on Ryanair soon. As much as I deplore their charging arrangements, on the email I received with my confirmation code the subject line is: “Ryanair Travel Itinerary – Don’t Forget You MUST Check-in Online and Print Off your Boarding Pass”.

    Then the first sentence after my reservation number is: “IN ORDER TO TRAVEL YOU ARE REQUIRED TO CHECK-IN ONLINE AND PRESENT AT THE AIRPORT YOUR ONLINE BOARDING PASS AND VALID ACCEPTED TRAVEL DOCUMENT, PASSENGERS WHO DO NOT PRESENT A BOARDING PASS AT THE AIRPORT WILL BE CHARGED A RE-ISSUE FEE OF EUR60/GBP60 excluding VAT (each boarding pass must be printed and presented on an individual A4 page).”

  • I think they are lying by omission. And, I mean not disclosing in the same font size that they used to suggest or inform the passenger to check in online. I believe if they had stated in that email “if you don’t check in online it will cost you 120 Euro” (120Euro!!!!!!!!!!!!) he would have checked in online.

    The airlines are getting pretty ridiculous!! But, in a sense, passengers have no one to blame but themselves. If you shop at Walmart, you can’t complain about cheap crap. If you want cheap airfare, then you get what you pay for, And, unfortunately it cost 120 Euro (120 Euro!!!). I’m still trippin on that.

  • MarkKelling

    Yes, when the business doesn’t charge enough for its products to cover the cost of doing business that is true.

  • MarkKelling

    Make sure it is really A4 paper and not American letter sized, or they will probably charge you the 60 to issue a proper sized document. ;-)

  • Michael__K

    And if you booked via the call-center or at the airport (or on a third party site), why would you be required to visit the Ryannair website?

    If this is a good-faith fee, why refrain from disclosing it through the call center or at the airport or in the checkin email?

    BTW, we must be looking at different Ryannair websites. The only mention of fees on the home page I get are the 8pt font links in the header and footer nav bars. The fees page does include a chart listing 33 fees, including a boarding card *re-issue* fee (which one could easily think based on the word-choice is for a lost boarding card).

  • Charlie Funk

    I agree both with the adequate disclosure as well as consumer failure to read. The cost to accomplish the task isn’t germaine to this discussion. Many products and services we purchase have a price far in excess of the cost to produce/provide and far more expensive than a similar, perhaps exact, product or service purchased elsewhere.

  • “But who has the time to surf the Internet, pre-flight?”

    Sorry, Chris, but I’m calling BS on this one. This site has been full of stories and comments demanding that hotels offer “free” WiFi because it is a “basic right” like hot water or electricity. Clearly, people today have the time, and more importantly, the desire, to surf the internet before heading to the airport. Heck, based on all the Facebook check-ins and tweets I see from friends on vacation, some might say, they have way too much time to surf. Even if you don’t have time to get on the internet, I’d also be willing to bet that a lot of hotels would be willing to print a boarding pass for you when you check out if you ask nicely.

    Getting back to the story at hand – one thing to keep in mind is that in Europe, public internet stations are far more common than they are here. When I was in Dublin, you could find an internet cafe on practically every street corner, at a cost of a couple of euros at most for a short session. The 60 euro fee for printing a boarding pass might be obnoxious, but from what I understand is pretty clearly disclosed by Ryanair, and is easy enough to avoid.

  • emanon256

    And if you booked via the call-center or at the airport (or on a third party site), why would you be required to visit the Ryannair website?

    Before doing business with any company, wouldn’t one visit their website and read about them?

    If this is a good-faith fee, why refrain from disclosing it through the call center or at the airport or in the checkin email?

    I don’t know I the fee was disclosed or not over the phone, but a quick Google search shows that people who got the check in e-mail the OP got, does state to check in on line or pay the fee at the airport. http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=3428321 Perhaps Chris could post the original checkin e-mail the OP got? Edit: See @ajt49 comment below.

    BTW, we must be looking at different Ryannair websites.

    Right in the center of the page under the sale banner just to the left of the flight search box it says Optional Fees/Charges and Click Here. The boarding pass fee is listed on the same screen along with a link that says “HOW TO AVOID PAYING OPTION FEES” which states the fee is avoided by presenting your on-line boarding pass. I think they are disclosing it pretty blatantly.

  • Adam_The_Man

    TOTAL SCAM!!! I can say it this time, so far 77% of people voted that its a scam.

  • EvilEmpryss

    Your OP is lying. Sorry, but I took three Ryanair flights this summer and for each flight received two emails reminding me to check in online and print out my boarding passes or I would have to pay the sixty euro fee. I still have those emails, and the warning is perfectly clear (even the one in Spanish was easy to read). At the top it states that the ticket holder MUST print out their boarding passes prior to arriving at the airport. Then, further down the email, right there under the big red banner that reads “Important Information” and “Online Checkin” it repeats the instructions in bold.

    They very clearly disclose what is actually a penalty for fliers who fail to pay attention to the rules. It’s easily avoidable (I asked my hotel concierge where I could get the passes printed and they cost me less than a euro) and clearly identified to the ticket holder. And we’re not just talking about the printer or paper costs: it requires personnel to be paid to stand around and wait for those passengers who didn’t bother to read their emails. Ryanair is a no-frills airline: they cut costs wherever they can, and staff is expensive. Even electronic kiosks have their associated maintenance costs. I would say that you get what you pay for but I was actually very happy with my inexpensive flights.

    Ryanair only makes money when people ignore the rules. Considering some of the other “gotchas” that airlines have pulled on their customers, I have no problems with this setup when it is made so clear to the fliers.

  • AAmerican1

    Ryan sent him an email that read “Don’t forget to check in on-line from 15 days up to 4 hours prior to your scheduled flight departure”. Not only did he not do that he did not question what would happen if he didn’t. If I received that email I would have questioned the consequences of not following their instructions. Perhaps Ryan should have revealed the consequences in the email but the fact remains Ryan sent him an email with specific instructions and he chose to ignore it. I can’t see where Ryan lied about the boarding pass fees. I think the question should have been “should Ryan have included the consequences of not following their instructions in the email” to which I would have responded “yes”.

  • EvilEmpryss

    I was in Rome this summer and had a heck of a time finding someplace to get pay-by-the-hour internet, much less free wi-fi, so I *might* have been a little sympathetic to the OP… except for the fact that he got the email and simply failed to read it. I can’t see how he missed the section of the boarding pass fees since it’s right above the section describing the procedures for EU/Non-EU citizens to check in.

  • EvilEmpryss

    Not true. I had my passes printed on American standard letter sized paper (it was all the printing place had on hand so I took my chances) and they didn’t say a word at any of the three airports I flew out of.

  • bodega3

    Isn’t this the case in any purchase you make?

  • bodega3

    I thought this site was for serious travel issues. However, this is another wasteful article. Yesterday’s was lame, too.

  • EvilEmpryss

    There is no omission. I have a copy of the emails I was sent when I flew. The very first line under my reservation number is:

    YOU MUST CHECK-IN ONLINE AND PRINT YOUR BOARDING PASS ON AN INDIVIDUAL A4 PAGE FOR PRESENTATION AT BOTH AIRPORT SECURITY AND AT THE BOARDING GATE.

    That is the exact style, in the same size font as the rest of the email (short of the slightly larger headings). Then, under the bright red heading “IMPORTANT INFORMATION” it reads:
    —-
    ONLINE CHECK-IN (bolded)
    YOU *MUST* CHECK-IN ONLINE AND PRINT YOUR BOARDING PASS ON AN INDIVIDUAL A4 PAGE AND PRINT YOUR BOARDING PASS FOR PRESENTATION AT BOTH AIRPORT SECURITY AND AT THE BOARDING GATE.

    Any passenger failing to present their online boarding pass at airport security or at the boarding gate will be charged a Boarding Card Re-issue Fee of £60/€60 per person/per one way flight at the airport self service kiosk or ticket desk. This facility is available up to 40 minutes prior to the scheduled flight departure.
    —–
    Seems pretty darned clear to me.

  • Pdoggs

    And if you just get the email telling you to check in and do not go to the website? What if you are on vacation and don’t have ready access to the internet? I have an iPhone so one would think I have internet access anywhere BUT I don’t use my phone outside the US due to data charges. Mr Vogelfanger read the email saying to check in online, Ryanair was able to send the email, could it not have also included a blurb about the fees involved if customers do not check in online? Why hide it and force customers to look for it on the website when you are sending them emails?

  • Sadie_Cee

    It’s a scam that unfortunately these airlines are going to be able to get away with. Were it not for sites like this one that exposes these unsavory practices, the entire travelling public would be unprepared for these money-making schemes. For the majority of travellers, boarding pass printout fees are an innovation. Placing information about it on the airline’s Web site is fine, but taking it for granted that the buyer will be looking for it and will find it there is a huge stretch.
    In this case, since Ryanair went to the trouble of informing the OP by e-mail message that he should print his boarding passes, why could they not have included information about the penalty he would face if he didn’t do so? Failing to include in their message word about the 120 euro fee he would face by not printing the boarding passes beforehand, was deceptive. I can find no proper justification for not informing him.
    After this, we all know that before self-booking air travel we should go to the Web sites of all relevant airlines, click on every tab and read every word BEFORE putting out our money. Even if we book through a TA, we have to know all the questions to ask and make sure we receive satisfactory answers BEFORE we put out our money. Isn’t this how it works in a PERFECT WORLD?

  • Pdoggs

    You’re saying the email customers get DOES have the check in at the airport pay a huge fee information on it?

  • EvilEmpryss

    Absolutely. I posted the text in a different response. Clear as day and NOT hidden in small print or in hard-to-find places.

  • Michael__K

    What did the consumer fail to read?

    Have you never made a $20 in-person purchase without first combing through the provider’s or manufacturer’s website?

  • backprop

    I’m taking a different stance.

    I do think the disclosure was adequate. I don’t think they lied.

    That said, I think it’s lousy that an airline makes you print the pass that THEY require you to have in order to board. And it’s something that not everyone has the ability to do – those booking from smartphones for instance.

    However, I don’t lump this in with scams. I just lump it in with all the reasons to not fly RyanAir.

  • ExplorationTravMag

    I think this is one of those times one can safely say, you get what you pay for. My mother and father always told me, “If something looks too good to be true, it probably is.” Low fares, to me, means they’re making it up somewhere else, and in this case, at the ticket kiosk.

  • Sadie_Cee

    I agree with you 100%. I love travelling in comfort and am prepared to pay the extra cost of flying first-class to ensure that I do so. If I don’t have the “readies” at the time, I stay home and do not complain about it. Twice recently I have had to travel in emergency situations and had to use discount agencies. Both times I made the reservations while speaking with a live human. Everything worked out extremely well.
    Just last week when posters here were reminiscing on past stories that boggled the mind, I wanted to mention this same woman, Terri Weissinger, but didn’t want to take the time to do so. It appears from the article below that US Airways apologized to her and dropped the change fee. In the end, the Church paid $60 and she boarded a flight for – destination not mentioned. I hope she made it to Idaho which was her original destination.
    http://www.whatsontianjin.com/news-1800-us-woman-teri-weissinger-trapped-in-sf-airport-for-8-days-for-lack-of-baggage-fees.html

  • MarkKelling

    I was joking. But knowing Ryan air, only half way joking.

  • Daddydo

    When you are acting as your own travel agent, you need to know the fine print. Period! It is pages long and tells you every single rule. Spirit does a fine job in our area, and each of my clients is aware of the possible additional costs. People who fly these airlines tend to be cheap and lazy. I want a cheap fare, but I do not want to read the rules. Tricks to make money? No these are hard core rules that were available to read. Use an ASTA travel agent!

  • Sadie_Cee

    Before I can state categorically that the OP is lying, both e-mails would have to be compared as to sending date, as well as the name and e-mail address of sender. If they are both the same, then we are left with one conclusion.

  • emanon256

    However Ryanair does include the consequences in the reminder e-mails. I posted a link above, and two other people posted the e-mails they received above as well.

  • JenniferFinger

    The fees may not cover the costs, but they are disclosed clearly. Vogelfanger was fairly warned that he should check in early.

  • emanon256

    How is it a scam?

    The customer buys a 19EU ticket (Or some similar number, that what the web site is advertising now). The website states there is a fee for not printing your boarding pass and has a big banner that says “How do I avoid these fees” Which states to print it yourself. Even though the customer could have found out on the website, the airline still sends an e-mail that blatantly states check in on-line and print your boarding passes or pay 60EU at the airport. The customer does not checkin on-line and print boarding passes, and then must pay the fee. He was informed, and did not act.

  • AAmerican1

    Sorry, didn’t see your post. If that’s the case what’s the beef? :-)

  • emanon256

    Wouldn’t one go to the website when decided to choose that airline? Not that it matters. The link in my message below, and the other customer of Ryanair who posted her/his e-mail below, both show that the e-mail blatantly states that if they do not print their boarding pass, they will be charged the fee at the airport, and lists the fee. So the OP was notified in the e-mail, and just chose not to act. Most hotels have computers and printers, I have even seen some with dedicated boarding pass kiosks. The few times I have been in a hotel that did not, the front desk employees have been more than happy to print my boarding pass for me. Every Rental property I have rented has had a computer and printer for guest use. And internet cafes are everywhere. Also, if someone is on vacation, wouldn’t they know from their outbound flight? It’s not like they don’t charge it on your outbound and then charge it on the return only. I guess if they flew another airline on the outbound they wouldn’t know form that, but the e-mail still informed them.

  • emanon256

    At Wendys. :)

    Oops, thats wheres the beef.

  • Michael__K

    I’ve gone backpacking on a multi-stop itinerary. I know a few senior citizens who travel and who don’t use computers or email.

    Regardless, would you accept this from any other type of business? If you bought a $20 product at your local store, and then found out (undisclosed at the point of purchase) that it couldn’t be used without an additional $72 component and it couldn’t be returned — would you think that’s okay? As long as the manufacturer had some fine print about the $72 fee on their website?

  • cjr001

    I could care less whether the fee is clearly labelled or not. This ‘fee’ is highway robbery.

  • The Ryanair Website could be a bit more specific about this fee. First of all, it calls it an “Airport Boarding Card Re-Issue Fee” which some might take to mean that you pay if the airline had to issue you a boarding pass for a second time, but not for the initial boarding pass.

    Secondly, even if you don’t find the terminology confusing, charging 60 Euros to print out the boarding pass (which I assume the passenger does using a self-serve kiosk) does seem excessive. Five Euros would be more reasonable.

    It looks like this fee has jumped substantially. In a January, 2011 story (“Judge rules Ryanair’s boarding-pass fee is illegal”) USA Today reported that a Spanish judge said “‘I declare unfair and therefore void the contractual clause in which
    Ryanair obliges the passenger to be the one who brings the printed
    boarding pass to travel or face a penalty of €40.'” The USA Today story said that Ryanair planned to appeal the judge’s decision.

    As far as I can tell, Ryanair does not have a smartphone app or another method of providing passengers with an electronic boarding pass that could be stored on a smartphone. So travelers that do not have access to a computer with an attached printer apparently are going to get stuck paying the boarding card fee.

  • JoJo449

    When will people learn. More often than not when you take the cheapest way it ends up costing you more. If people stop patronizing companies like Ryanair & Spirit airlines they would have no choice but to stop these outrageous fees but as long as suckers continue to pay them they’ll just keep adding more. Wake up people. You get what you pay for, or as in this case, less than what was paid for.

  • emanon256

    If you go backpacking or don’t use a computer, then choose a different airline or expect to pay more. There is a reason RyanAir has 19EU one-way tickets while everyone else charges 80EU or more on the same routes. You pay the same in the end, unless you read.

    Your comparison is apples to oranges. There is a difference between buying a product where I get something physical in return, and pre-paying for future travel. If I can’t return the product, I can still re-sell it or give it away, I can’t with an airline ticket, so I do more homework. Even so, when I am buying a product, even a low cost one, I do my research first. I also ask if something can be returned when I buy it, and if it’s not, I do my research first which includes asking if I need anything else to use it. In fact, I was looking at a printer recently, and found out it doesn’t come with a cable, and a printer that was a little more, but less than the cost of a cable did come with one. I also found really bad reviews for the printer that didn’t come with a cable.

  • EvilEmpryss

    I seriously doubt that the canned emails I received differed significantly from what the OP received. I booked three separate reservations out of three different European airports (including one in Italy). For *each* of those flights I received three emails: one about the cabin baggage restrictions and two about the requirement to check in online and print a boarding pass prior to arriving at the airport or be required to pay the fee. I received six of the emails in English and three in Spanish because one of the flights I booked while using the .sp site, and all of them said the same thing. Print before arrival or pay the fee.

    It is easier to believe that the OP neglected to read the email and is lying by omission to make his case against paying the boarding pass fee than it is to believe that RyanAir suddenly “forgot” to include this vital information in their automated email to him.

    I have the emails I received from RyanAir and will be more than happy to forward them to Chris to prove that this information is clearly stated in their correspondence.

  • EvilEmpryss

    *grin* I still took a chance with the paper, considering the kinds of difficulties some people run into with airlines. I even *gasp!* tore one of the sheets of paper so that it was only the size of the boarding pass and that was accepted. After the pat-down by security I think I got off easy when it came to the tickets. :p

  • emanon256

    @Chris I responded to this and my post was mysteriously deleted. I am not sure I like this new Disqus.

    And if you booked via the call-center or at the airport (or on a third party site), why would you be required to visit the Ryannair website?

    I think it’s always good measure to read about a company before doing business with them, especially if I am buying something non-refundable ticket. If it’s in person or over the phone, I always ask about what other fees I should expect.

    If this is a good-faith fee, why refrain from disclosing it through the call center or at the airport or in the checkin email?

    It may have been disclosed over the phone, it doesn’t say one way or another. It is however fully disclosed in the e-mail. I even posted a link to an e-mail when I replied to this earlier; I guess that’s why my post was removed.

    BTW, we must be looking at different Ryannair websites.

    Under the price banner, directly to the left of where you enter your cities when booking there is a big box that states terms and other fees, etc. and states click here. It’s not hidden, if you can see where you enter booking into, you can see this too. When you “Click Here” it goes directly to a page that states the fee and the re-printing fee is on that page without scrolling either. There is a big link that says “How do I avoid paying other fees” and when you click it, one of the first items listed states that if you print your boarding pass and bring it with you and use it, you will not have to pay the 60UE fee to have them re-print it. It took me a few seconds to find that, and was pretty clear.

  • EvilEmpryss

    It’s not a fee, it’s a non-conformity tax. You only pay the price if you don’t follow the rules. You’d hate to hear what they charge people who have to gate-check their bags because they didn’t pay attention to the rule about only one carry on.

  • You win.

  • Michael__K

    I also ask if something can be returned when I buy it,

    You expect to get accurate information at the point of purchase even if you haven’t read through the merchant’s website?

    What is the relevant distinction between a product and a service? I expect full disclosure at the point of purchase in either case.

  • Michael__K

    I had a post (on another article) mysteriously disappear shortly before the Disqus change. Seems that Disqus auto-flags some comments for moderation for unclear reasons and I’m not sure if Chris gets the notifications.
    ———-

    Looks like we ARE looking at different Ryannair websites. To the left of the flight search box, I get an advertisement for 12GBP fares (about $18.82) and underneath that is a “News” section featuring “Ryannair Announces Q1 Results” and “Bremen Airport Closure – Germany”.

    I gather you never make any purchase of $18+ without doing thorough online research first. Good for you.

  • Sadie_Cee

    The OP in this case alleges that the e-mail he received did NOT include information about the 120 euro penalty for not printing out his boarding passes before arriving at the airport. Without any information to the contrary, I had to believe the OP. If it can be substantiated that the OP is lying, then I would be forced to discredit his assertions.

  • emanon256

    It does sound like we are, very odd. Mine has a US extension if that means anything. I don’t see the news part on mine.

    Believe it or not, I spent at least 30min researching which $5 hose splitter to buy. The last one I bought broke in a few months, and some of my plants dies before I was able to replace it. I wanted to make sure that wouldn’t happen again.

  • EvilEmpryss

    It’s called a re-issue because the *primary* issue is supposed to be done by the traveler. There are places one can have the passes printed out at, even while traveling. I emailed the PDFs of my passes from my iPod to a Kinko’s-type business in Madrid.

    And they can’t use electronic boarding passes because travel in the EU by non-EU residents requires the boarding pass to be stamped to prove that the proper travel documents have been presented.

    No matter what they charge, someone will complain. Making the cost of printing at the airport excessive is a great deterrent. It dissuades people from shrugging off the low penalty and requiring RyanAir to staff the ticket counter with people just to take care of printing passes.

  • I agree with you. I think people get what they pay for. It’s the reason I will never fly one of these airlines. I think it’s worth it to pay for convenience, and comfort. And, lets face it, some things should NOT be charge. For example to pay for both checked luggage and carryon. Who isn’t going to need clothes where they’re going. It’s ridiculous.

  • emanon256

    Yes I do expect to get accurate information at the point of purchase, and if they are unsure, I don’t purchase it unless I am willing to accept the consequences myself.

    A product is a tangible item that I can return, re-sell, or give away if I need to, so while I still do homework, I do less as it will have some value to someone else if it doesn’t for me. A service would be very specific such as someone installing something in my house specific to my house, and airfare, a massage, etc. If I pre-pay for a service, it’s not always something that can be refunded or given away, so I do extra homework. I bought a lamp recently at TJ Max that was marked down for $300 to $100, and then marked down again to $60 and sold as-is. I inspected it myself, made sure it turned on, and even opened the bottom to make sure the wires were okay. I also looked up reviews on my phone. Then I determined it was worth $60, but if something does go wrong, it’s my own fault. It’s marked down very low, and I did my due diligence, but I am still taking a risk with it. So far it’s working, but if it had a problem, of if I found out it needed a $76 part to work, I would have accepted it and moved on.

  • cjr001

    I’d love to see from which corporate backside you pulled the term “non-conformity” from (I’m guessing that the people at this airline didn’t come up with it first).

    Call it whatever you want, spell it however you want, it’s still robbery.

  • She’s the Ryanair spokes person. Any one could read that you were joking. But, in all honesty to take Ryanair is for jokers. I’d never fly them, ever. I like convenience and comfort and I can pay for it.

  • Thank you. Some people don’t get that it’s robbery. And all rules aren’t right. It’s gouging their customers and they know it.

  • Michael__K

    http://www.ryanair.com/en ? (That’s what http://www.ryanair.com redirects to for me)

  • emanon256

    Two other posters cut-and-paste their e-mails from Ryanair showing that it said to print it or pay the fee, and I posted a link earlier to a website with the e-mail, however Disqus removed it. So if others are getting an e-mail with the fee, it’s hard to believe they would simply remove that section of the OPs e-mail, and not everyone else.

  • emanon256

    Yep that one, now the news is showing up. The “Click Here” is above the news, and below the ad.

  • EvilEmpryss

    It’s the same reasoning as any number of fines that we accept in our lives for those who do not follow the rules — in a sense they’re stupidity taxes. You speed, you pay a speeding fine. You don’t speed, you don’t have to pay speeding fines. You print your pass out before you get to the airport, you don’t pay the printing fine.

    If you abide by the clearly stated rules, you don’t pay the price. How is that robbery?

  • Michael__K

    Airlines don’t provide “very specific” customized services. They provide a generic commoditized service.

    A better comparison would be tickets for performances or extended warranties..

    Should people be sold those things in person for $X and then be told (when they show up for the performance or call for warranty service) that they should have checked the fine print online first because it actually costs $X + $72?

  • EvilEmpryss

    Nope, I’m just a traveler. One who had absolutely zero trouble traveling on RyanAir, even though I’m disabled and required extra assistance. Compared to my last flight on United, for cost, comfort, professionalism, and on-time travel I’d take RyanAir any day.

    Maybe it confused you that I have my facts straight and can back them up with evidence rather than just emotional diatribes about companies I’ve never patronized?

  • emanon256

    I was thinking SFO-LGA on August 10 at 2:30pm for me and me only when I said specific.

    I have never purchased an extended warrantee and so far I have yet to buy a concert ticket had fine print saying I would have to pay extra later. They do have all of the extra fees at purchase which annoy me, but they are disclosed before I buy. If someone is selling tickets to the same show for $60 less, and the fine print says if I don’t print the ticket at home I have to pay $60 to have it printed, I would be fine with that. However, I can still re-sell concert tickets, I can’t re-sell airline tickets.

  • Michael__K

    I think I see what you’re referring to now — on my monitor it’s a barely legible part of the ad image. It’s not text-searchable and it refers to “[GBP]6 Admin fee per person/per sector applies unless paid with Ryanair’s Cash Passport Card. Click here”

  • Lindabator

    It was a reminder AFTER he had already booked online, where it is VERY clear what those fees are. A hard pill to swallow, but something it was his responsibility to double check.

  • Michael__K

    but they are disclosed before I buy

    Exactly! So why don’t you hold airlines to that standard?

    If a concert venue decided you couldn’t re-sell tickets and you had to show ID for admission, would that make it okay for them to stop disclosing extra fees at purchase?

  • emanon256

    I see on the right side “Optional Fees” and under it Click Here which is underlined. I was drawn to it and saw optional fees click here. When I just went back, I also noticed FEES in the header which goes to the same page, and I just tried to do a booking which makes me click a box that says I agree to the terms, and even then after selecting my flight, which shows a total of 20EU, before I continue it says that the ticket is subject to optional fees and has a link that says “Click here for details” under the statement that its subject to fees, the link goes to the same page showing the fee with the link saying how to avoid it.

  • emanon256

    Because the airline also disclosed it before I bought it, and it even tells me what I need to do to not have to pay it. I do hold them to the same standards.

    If a concert venue decided you couldn’t re-sell tickets and you had to show ID for admission, would that make it okay for them to stop disclosing extra fees at purchase?

    No, it would not mean it’s okay for them to stop disclosing fee. It would mean I need to make extra sure what the fees are before I make my purchase.

  • Ryanair discloses its fees, you pay attention when you book in online, it is all there. It saves staff, keeps cost low, and puts extra charges on those who use additional services. We use Ryanair out of Limoges, France either to London or Nottingham. Who else uses this service; primarily Brits with second homes in France, others making short stay trips. Our last trip cost 66 euros each round trip each. Try doing that overland by train, for example, 4-5 times more expensive, 4-5 times as long (the flight takes 75 mins). We had each only one strictly dimensioned and weighed bag – nothing else. One hold bag, a fee, two and a much bigger fee; pay online, or pay much more at the airport. Fine with me, if I needed to take a bag, it would still probably be cheaper than going another way. In fact we sometimes go from Bordeaux to London, Easy jet fares are lower, but if you add a hold bag and other fees, BA and Easyjet final fares are much the same.

    In the end the market Ryanair serves manages pretty well to handle its web site, and its success shows that. You might be surprised at how many British registered cars are parked at Limoges airport, driven away by their British owners for a week or weekend at their second residence in France – and I would bet the same is true at other small airports served by Ryanair, lik Bergerac, Rodez, etc.
    This model expands; we flew from Bordeaux to Barcelona for a 5 day visit. Same rules, same extra charges, and all went well – we avoided a 8 hou train ride, and went there in 65 mins. The airline is Vueling, a subsidiary of Iberia it seems.

  • Lindabator

    Exactly – if you don’t like the rules, book another airline!

  • emanon256

    How is it robbery if no one actually has to pay it?

  • Lindabator

    Then don’t book the airline – pay the higher rates on the other carriers – some folks have no problem with following the rules, and saving the bucks. (Personally, i choose to pay more for good service)

  • Michael__K

    If he really booked online at ryanair.com then the terms state that this fee is “N/A” (presumably “Not Applicable”).

    It specifically lists that the 60GBP fee applies when one “Booked via a Call Centre or Airport”

    http://www.ryanair.com/en/terms-and-conditions#regulations-tableoffees

  • random_observation_source

    It is premature to call the OP a liar without seeing the actual emails in question. Online companies often change small things for a small amount of their traffic in order to test new functions or measure profitability. Google, Facebook, all do it, and the major online travel agencies probably do it as well (technique is called A/B testing – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ab_testing).
    It is entirely possible that a clever product manager at Ryan Air incentivized by profit engineered a test for 0.5% of itineraries awaiting check-in to _not_ include the warnings about the fees in the email, on order to see how much that blurb affects bottom-line profit.
    This probably makes absolutely no difference in whether or not this can be mediated, or if the OP would get their money back if he complains, but it hopefully slows down (even a little bit) the race to judgment in calling the OP a liar just because you’ve had a different experience.

  • Michael__K


    Because the airline also disclosed it before I bought it

    How do you know it was disclosed *at the point of purchase* ?

  • TonyA_says

    There is no issue here with the airline. The problem is that people do not read and understand the rules BEFORE they buy.

  • TonyA_says

    Yeah, I can’t believe there are not real serious issues out there. Not this one.

  • TonyA_says

    RyanAir has a fees link on top of the page !!!!
    http://www.ryanair.com/en/terms-and-conditions#regulations-tableoffees
    That’s all they need according to law.

  • TonyA_says

    It’s unbelievable! SOME Customers demanding that RyanAir be the airline they are not. Don’t they understand what “Low Cost” means ??? :-)

  • Michael__K

    In 8pt font on the nav bar. I already pointed that out.

    The fee is listed as “N/A” if you booked at ryanair.com It is 60GBP if you booked by phone or at the airport.

    They have no duty to disclose fees to people who don’t book online?

  • TonyA_says

    Normally, the simply have to have Tariff (fare rules) available for inspection at the airport and/or online. Is there anything else one needs ???

  • Michael__K

    If the fee only applies to purchases by phone or in-person, aren’t those the settings where disclosure is most critical? (at the point of purchase, not at the point of departure when it’s too late).

  • AUSSIEtraveller

    how stupid is this guy ?
    Dumber & dumber !!!
    He ws told to
    “Don’t forget to check-in on line from 15 days up to 4 hours prior to your scheduled flight departure
    Ryanair could have said, you failed to check in, go away, but instead they gave him the option to pay this late fee.
    Airlines don’t want to pay outrageous airport rental fees.
    You should be having a go at aiport monopolies not airlines.
    Most airport operate on a cost + basis, with very little direct competition.
    In some countries like Australia, airports like SYD have to be consulted before a new airport can be built.
    Wish we could all work that way.

  • TonyA_says

    Have you ever read the [tariff] fare rules? Very long and in “Greek” -:) Unless you ask a specific question over the phone, they don’t owe you an explanation. Your obligation is to read the tariff rules if you don’t ask.

  • Michael__K

    That’s why this is (as Chris writes) “a perversion of capitalism.” You wouldn’t tolerate any other business failing to disclose its fees at the point of sale in this manner.

  • TonyA_says

    And how do you vote for your political leaders ???
    Surprise, surprise. I have yet to see a UTILITY or pseudo-utility bill that tells me exactly what I will pay in plain English. IMO carriers are pseudo-utilities because they are regulated.

  • Michael__K

    I don’t vote in the UK. I don’t believe Ryanair flies in the U.S.

  • emanon256

    Wouldn’t one go to the website when decided to choose that airline? Not that it matters. The link in my message below, and the other customer of Ryanair who posted her/his e-mail below, both show that the e-mail blatantly states that if they do not print their boarding pass, they will be charged the fee at the airport, and lists the fee. So the OP was notified in the e-mail, and just chose not to act. Most hotels have computers and printers, I have even seen some with dedicated boarding pass kiosks. The few times I have been in a hotel that did not, the front desk employees have been more than happy to print my boarding pass for me. Every Rental property I have rented has had a computer and printer for guest use. And internet cafes are everywhere. Also, if someone is on vacation, wouldn’t they know from their outbound flight? It’s not like they don’t charge it on your outbound and then charge it on the return only. I guess if they flew another airline on the outbound they wouldn’t know form that, but the e-mail still informed them.

  • emanon256

    If you go backpacking or don’t use a computer, then choose a different airline or expect to pay more. There is a reason RyanAir has 19EU one-way tickets while everyone else charges 80EU or more on the same routes. You pay the same in the end, unless you read.

    Your comparison is apples to oranges. There is a difference between buying a product where I get something physical in return, and pre-paying for future travel. If I can’t return the product, I can still re-sell it or give it away, I can’t with an airline ticket, so I do more homework. Even so, when I am buying a product, even a low cost one, I do my research first. I also ask if something can be returned when I buy it, and if it’s not, I do my research first which includes asking if I need anything else to use it. In fact, I was looking at a printer recently, and found out it doesn’t come with a cable, and a printer that was a little more, but less than the cost of a cable did come with one. I also found really bad reviews for the printer that didn’t come with a cable.

  • flutiefan

    about 2/3 of the passengers i check in show up with no paperwork. it’s infuriating!

  • flutiefan

    “Do you really expect us to believe that a sliver of paper and a little printer ink costs $72? Or even $5?”

    i don’t believe that my Coke at the movies costs $6.95, or even $2.95, but that’s sure as heck what the theater charges. can you get on that next, Chris? it makes just as much sense…

  • Michael__K

    You mean the price of a Coke at the movie theatre isn’t posted?

    Do you pay them the posted $6.95, and then they ask you for a mug? What mug? Didn’t you study their website before you went to the movies? It’s bring your own mug or else you owe an extra $25 for a souvenir cup. And you can’t change your mind and get your $6.95 back. Sorry.

  • TonyA_says

    They need to change from e-ticketing to i-ticketing.
    I think you know what I mean by the “I” :-)

  • That’s crazy! Unless people are just using their mobile devices / ipads? I’d NEVER arrive at the airport without something…

  • I’ve done lots of cheap one-ways in my time. But I’ll build it into my itinerary to get to a computer 24 hours before my departure, least of all to check to make sure the flight is still on. If you’re close enough to an airport, you’re close enough to a computer…

  • Without knowing how much Ryanair and the others would charge, your post conveys no information of note.

    The point that you fail to grasp is that on any given day a budget airline might be great or it might not be. You simply have to know the rules and make the comparison ensuring that the comparison is truly apples to apples.

  • yes.

  • That’s insane. That said, who in this day and age just shows up at the airport with no paperwork?
    ——————————————————–
    Perhaps someone intending to use the Kiosk to print a boarding pass.

  • johnb78

    You’re wrong. We know, obviously, that Ryanair’s fee for the journey would be at least $0. Even if the fare is $1, only a terminal masochist would be unwilling to pay the trivial difference between that and $20 each way to avoid the budget airline experience.

    Budget airlines’ existence is great, as is the existence of the required number of terminal masochists and people who don’t know the rules to keep them in business. But it’s rare that they’ll work out significantly cheaper than a “full-fare” carrier.

    The only exception is when the “full” fare carrier quotes fees in the multiple hundreds for a short trip (e.g. a Friday evening flight booked on the same Friday morning) – at that point, budget airlines can become price competitive. Although they often *still* aren’t, since obviously they’d be daft not to jack their fares up at peak times too.

  • You know what they say about people who “ass+u=me”….

  • flutiefan

    ;) love it!

    p.s. when i say “do you have an e-ticket?” they look at me as if i’d just asked them if they’re from Mars.

  • flutiefan

    i’d say less than half of those who have no papers actually have their confirm # saved on their phone or something. and then when the date is wrong or they show up at the wrong airport (happens ALL the time), they say it’s my fault and refuse to accept responsibility.

  • flutiefan

    but isn’t it a good idea to have your confirmation paper, at least saved on your phone, to be able to use the kiosk? sometimes credit cards are de-magnitized and don’t work.

  • TonyA_says

    The airlines should charge a $25 e-ticket lookup fee (with $15 going to the desk agent). The rules actually state the pax must give their e-ticket # (or RLOC for some carriers) AND an suitable ID.
    They have gotten so used in just coming to the airport with just their blank stares :-)

  • judyserienagy

    Another beautiful example of outrageous. Why do people continue to patronize these kinds of companies?

  • Your post continued to make unfounded assertions.

    As far it it being rare that they work out better than a full service airlines, how do you support that statement or it is something that you just felt and everyone else should accept.

    I personally wouldn’t fly Ryanair. However, to make a blanket statement that no one should reflects a certain arrogance that your way of traveling is the only way.

    When I travel I prefer a certain level of comfort and luxury. I generally do 4 star hotels. One buddy like greater comfort and luxury and he prefers five star hotels, while another can sleep anywhere. He is happy at a hostel. While I refuse to step foot in a hostel, it would be arrogant presumption on my part to call him or the other occupants “terminal masochists” because it doesn’t fit into my own limited world view.

    You also fail to grasp that while a budget carrier may or may not be the best choice for that particular route, it may be for another route. At what point in the differential sufficient that you would consider it reasonable to fly a budget airline. $20? $30? $40? $100. These are arbitrary bright lines for which reasonable people may differ.

  • Who’s assuming.

  • There are many good ideas. It comes down to risk tolerance and likelihood of having problems. How often do all of your credit card get de-magnitized?

    At the AA kiosks you can use your credit card, ATM card, passport, or in my case, the frequent flier number that I’ve had since the early 90s. The only time I’ve ever had an issue, was pre-911 when I was a consultant and the travel consultant booked me under the name Sarrow.

    Now having said that, if I am traveling on a code-share then I will absolutely have all of my papework because I figure there is a much greater chance of drama as the number of entities increase.

    I would also have my paperwork if I booked travel other than on the providers website. However, the last time that happened was in the early 2000’s.

  • What if the fee was $2000. If you want to sit while waiting for your flight it’s $500. What if want to take a leak on the flight it’s $100. What if every airline does this? How far you want to take this? Customers have every right to complain. Sadly we’re headed to a future where you pay $1 initially for absolutely anything, then are piecemealed by addons endlessly. Oh, you want a fork with dinner? That’s $5. How many fees to people want to have to keep track of? Fees work, are massively profitable, and as the comment here show have endless people that can’t see the forest for the trees.

  • Until they all do it… because nobody said anything.

  • Thomas Ralph

    I can’t accept either option. The fees are adequately disclosed and are not a scam. If people choose to follow Ryanair’s established processes, they will be rewarded by lower fees. Me, I choose not to fly Ryanair.

  • Michael__K


    I’ll build it into my itinerary to get to a computer 24 hours before my departure

    I generally do too. The topic here was printers. I’ve never booked on an ultra-discount carrier and I don’t ever intend to. And I don’t stress when the hotel printer fails or spits out a boarding pass that is arguably less than completely legible (neither of which is unusual).

    And if getting to a computer 24 hours in advance means spending an extra night where you didn’t otherwise intend to, then you won’t necessarily come out ahead.

    And I submit that all of this is besides the point if the fee isn’t disclosed at the point of sale, which isn’t always the internet.

  • Michael__K

    Friday May 18, 2012:
    “Ryanair shuts website but demands online check-in”

    Consumer groups have criticised Ryanair for temporarily closing its website over one of the busiest weekends of the year – yet refusing to waive penalties for passengers who fail to check in online.

    Europe’s biggest budget carrier shut down the Ryanair.com online check-in facility at 4pm today for what the airline describes as “upgrade maintenance”.

    It is due to re-open at noon on Sunday.

    During the time the airline is offline, more than one-third of a million passengers are booked to fly with the Irish carrier.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/ryanair-shuts-website-but-demands-online-checkin-7766857.html

  • emanon256

    There is an app for that. :)

  • emanon256

    Wrong Airport! WOW! I have seen people show up on the wrong day.

  • alex

    I fly Ryanair regularly (around once a week on average) I have had no
    problems with their charges. They are all clearly posted and easy to
    understand.

    The purpose of the charges is to modify your behaviour as a passenger.
    On that basis it is easy to justify the £60 boarding pass reissue fee.
    If you are the only passenger on a given day who turns up to the airport
    without your pass, the member of staff who serves you is only there to
    serve you! your £60 will not cover the cost of their salary and
    associated costs, it is not just about the paper and ink cost.

    The same is true for the baggage costs, Ryanair do not want you to take
    any checked bags with you, they have to pay for staff to deal with them.
    They want you to take hand luggage which fits into the little cage (and
    thus the overhead lockers on the plane) so that they can turn their
    planes around quickly. I believe they aim to spend only 25 – 45 minutes
    on the ground between flights and most of their flights so that each plane can make 4 return flights every day.

    I have some sympathy for a non European audience who may not be used to
    the business model but the charges are certainly not hidden. (For those
    who like to joke about them charging for the air that you breath, you
    don’t have to look to far to find the charge for oxygen!(medicinal))

    Finally your survey is valueless and insults your readers. Without at
    least a none of the above option, your results will be meaningless.

  • If the airports are sister airports it can happen. Like in the Bay area, we have Oakland, San Jose, and San Francisco. I routinely fly out of San Jose and San Francisco depending on convenience and cost. I can see possibly getting confused. Both airports are less than 25 minutes from my house.

  • Amy Jackson

    I agree about with you about the out of control fees, and that little
    extra fee for some service and hassle-free travel but how many airlines
    actually do this? Even if you do get to travel with the more expensive
    option, some of these airlines still do these “hidden” charges and the
    service isn’t that top notch either.

  • flutiefan

    honestly, passengers have de-magnitized cards all day, every day. i don’t know what they’re doing with those suckers, but they sure as heck won’t swipe!
    and i get SO MANY that only have 1 card… so if it doesn’t work, they are out of luck (because of course they didn’t bring their confirmation number or know their FF#).
    add to that the tons of people who have their names spelled wrong — either by their travel bookers or by themselves, mistyping…. or they put “Steve” on their reservation, and their credit card says “Stephen”. to a computer, that is 2 separate names.

    it gets really annoying when they walk up to the counter and have no clue of their own flight information– times, cities, etc.

    as others have said before, the traveling public has demanded lower prices, which was achieved by the airlines automating many of the processes, including adding self-check-in. then the public gets made at me when they don’t bring the information required to use self-check-in, and they have to wait for me to finish helping the 4 other people who DID do everything correctly. i can’t win!

  • Sounds like you have some very infrequent fliers as customers. I have no idea what your passengers are doing to their cards. The only card I’ve ever had demagnitize was an ATM card from a bank that used such cheap cards that they didn’t even have your name on it.

    As far as automation goes, it all depends. For me, automation rocks for simple, routine tasks. I rather use a live person for complex tasks. Kiosks are great for checking in. They are infinitely faster than waiting in line for a human and some airlines have more kiosks than live people. I prefer ATMs over tellers and I prefer self checkout at the grocery store.

    I promise you, if I’m in your line, I won’t give you are hard time ;-)

  • People who assume there’s going to be a kiosk where they can print their boarding passes for free. Really? You couldn’t follow that logic?

  • Ann Lamoy

    You don’t have to comb through the website. I just booked a fake flight and at the bottom it gives me a total price and this: (and since checked baggage fees are not included or other optional charges you can bet I would click the “click here for detail link”) Optional charges such as admin fee of £6/€6 per person/per sector and checked baggage fees are not included.
    Click here for detail

  • Michael__K

    Who said Mr. Volferganger bought his ticket online?

    Did you “click here for details?” And did you look at their table of fees? The “Boarding Card Re-issue fee” is listed as “n/a” if you book your ticket on ryanair.com. It is listed as 60GBP only if you book your ticket by phone or at the airport..

  • I can’t wrap my head around paying a bank to withdraw my own money at its terminal. I would have to change banks. Plain and simple. When I was in school, my bank charged you to call and get your balance via its electronic phone system. Changed banks then as well.