Wow .. on the wrong international flight...

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Feb 9, 2016
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hmmmm, idk... there are no details on exactly how it happened, and the article ends with a suggestion to use a specifc site in order to avoid this fiasco. I smell an advertisement in the form of fake news.

Sounds like a nightmare, right? If you need help booking a better flight to avoid your own travel fiasco, here are the best services to help you hunt down a deal. And, before you take off, make sure you have these 11 essential grooming products packed in your bag.
 
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AMA

Verified Member
Dec 11, 2014
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I remember a few years ago, someone ended up going to Auckland, New Zealand instead of Oakland, California. Apparently Australian flight announcers pronounce "Auckland" like Oakland.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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Still clear in my mind is my memory of boarding the wrong plane, stowing, sitting, hearing the announcement of our destination. There I sat like a cow, staring at the FA. To this day I have no idea how I managed to get on the wrong plane. I remember all the gate people thinking it was funny.
 
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Jul 27, 2016
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I was once settled into my seat at SFO for my flight back to JFK, when the FA came over the intercom welcoming everyone on United's flight XYZ to Narita. In retrospect, I had noticed a very high Asian population in the cabin. Needless to say, got off the plane. Neighboring gates, and this was in the days before the bar code scanners at the gate.
 
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Mar 10, 2015
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This seems very strange since ever time I've flown from Europe to the US, I've had to go through an extra layer of security that exists right before the section in the airport that does US flights. I assumed this was because of 9/11.

Whenever I've flown within Europe, even to the U.K., I've not seen this extra security check. Though I've not flown to the U.K. while in Europe for a few years, so maybe things changed.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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This seems very strange since ever time I've flown from Europe to the US, I've had to go through an extra layer of security that exists right before the section in the airport that does US flights. I assumed this was because of 9/11.

Whenever I've flown within Europe, even to the U.K., I've not seen this extra security check. Though I've not flown to the U.K. while in Europe for a few years, so maybe things changed.
Yes Jevia it has changed. In smaller EU airports U.K. flights can be near US flights -- UK is not a part of the Schengen Agreement so there is the passport control issue and with the terrorist attacks in the U.K. there are often additional security checks.

I could see the two gates being next to each other what i cannot imagine is how the passenger never noticed or heard destination check, pilot saying flight time etc (headphones?) let alone not one gate agent noticing the wrong destination.
 
Mar 10, 2015
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Not to mention that with so many flights usually full that no other passenger had his seat assignment
 
May 17, 2016
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I seriously question the devices that scan the boarding passes. After reading enough horror stories about wrong flights, wrong seats, etc., I doubt they do more than make noise with each scan. Shouldn't they be actually checking the info on the boarding passes and sound an alarm at a mismatch? Apparently they don't. Ridiculous!
 
Jul 27, 2016
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I seriously question the devices that scan the boarding passes. After reading enough horror stories about wrong flights, wrong seats, etc., I doubt they do more than make noise with each scan. Shouldn't they be actually checking the info on the boarding passes and sound an alarm at a mismatch? Apparently they don't. Ridiculous!
Human error is human error and the law of large numbers. If the scanners work properly, and staff use them properly, 99.999% of the time, there will be several dozen errors in the US every single day.
 
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Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
The scanner might have well scanned it as it was a valid pass. It was just at the wrong gate and I don't know if anything would come up on the scanner indicating that to the gate agent. They just don't look, they just scan.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
9,894
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San Francisco
The scanner might have well scanned it as it was a valid pass. It was just at the wrong gate and I don't know if anything would come up on the scanner indicating that to the gate agent. They just don't look, they just scan.
I agree; if they scanned AND looked, fewer issues would arise.
 
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