TSA Pre-check misses mark

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Aug 29, 2015
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The occasional traveler, someone who only flies once a year or so, isn't going to shell out $85 every five years and have their fingerprints run, not to mention the time it takes. Mom flies 2-3 times a year and refused to pay for it.

Hubby and I did, but it was when I had 4 trips in 2 months that I decided that I was going to go for it. If I only flew once a year? No way!

DS has it now that his DOD number is accepted as his KTN, but we would not have bought it for him for the once a year flight.
 
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Aug 28, 2015
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News article about TSA's pre-check and how it's current failure is supposedly the consumer's fault:

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/how-tsa-s-big-bet-sell-travelers-precheck-program-fell-n577631
Thank you for the link. I would like to apply for one of these pre check things myself. i wonder if airlines compensate for increased TSA efficiency through pre check with reduced airline personnel at those airports, effectively making it all slow for everyone again.
 

jsn55

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Dec 26, 2014
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I normally scoff at stuff like Pre-Check, mostly because I don't believe it will ever work right. But United gave me Pre-Check for a couple of years and I couldn't WAIT to sign up when TSA started phasing out the airline involvement. The freedom from the shoes, the laptop, the BS ... I'd pay $85 a YEAR for it.
 
Sep 6, 2015
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I am glad I decided to enroll in pre-check if only not to have to take my shoes off (double knee replacements make getting them back on a production). Here in Minneapolis they were using pre-check as kind of a pressure relief valve to manage long lines. One of the people who got through was flagged for her involvement with the SLA (Patty Hearst situation) and they can't do that anymore. Compound that with their very expensive new checkpoints (from six down to two that theTSA asked for promising better efficiency) where at least four were dedicated to pre-check because they expected a huge number of passengers to sign up, and you have a big mess. Even the pre-check lane can get pretty backed up. The TSA says it's a matter of staffing, and they six hundred new employees in the pipeline. Problem is, they loose about 100 a week, which means they have about a six week supply coming in.
 

Barry Graham

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I interpreted this as saying not that people only have themselves to blame if they are stuck in a huge line when they could be sailing through with TSA Pre. To a certain extent I agree, just like some people waiting in long lines to go through tolls could apply for EZPass but don't.

Where the argument fails is that if everyone were in TSA Pre, it would take longer there too, although they would then be able to designate more TSA Pre lines and reduce times somewhat.

I paid for global entry which gave me TSA Pre. It was a smart investment for me.
 
Mar 10, 2015
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My family only flights a couple of times a year and didn't feel it was necessary to sign up for pre-check at $85 each. But last year, the security line was very long and we came close to missing our flight despite being well on time to check in. So we decided to do it this year, so we'll see how it goes. I'm not thrilled with the cost or the process (at least I work near an interview site, so will only need to take a 'long lunch', but my husband will need to take the whole afternoon off work for his interview), but if it gives us more peace of mind to make our flights, plus less hassle (shoes, electronics, etc.), it will hopefully be worth it.

I saw in my application process that kids 12 and under can go through pre-check with pre-check approved parents, so I don't understand why the one guy in the article signed his 4 year old up. Now for global entry, even kids have to sign up to participate.
 
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Sep 6, 2015
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I wish they would open a few lanes specifically for families, as well as people who need some extra assistance, whether they have pre-check or not. That's not a dig against people traveling with their kids. I think it would be less stressful for the parents and it would be less frustrating for people who travel frequently (and who know the drill so well they could do it in their sleep). When pre-check first began, my husband was offered the chance to apply for pre check free of charge. I'm sure if it was less expensive, more would apply. Unfortunately, getting more people to apply isn't going to solve the immediate problem. Testifying before Congress a week or two ago, the head of the TSA blamed the backlog on the people carrying their luggage on the plane
rather than checking it. I think that's a bunch of bull. It's not a new phenomenon -- airlines have been charging for checked luggage for quite a while, and when asked about it recently, they said they were not going to remove checked luggage fees, and yet they are willing to offer money to add extra employees to assist the TSA with the cattle prodding.
 
Mar 10, 2015
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I agree that a lane for families would be helpful. My kids are old enough now to do things for themselves, but when they were younger it took quite a bit of extra time getting their jackets/shoes off/on, organizing/watching their carry-on bags, corralling them through the scanner, and as a baby, taking them out of their stroller, taking it apart, going through the scanner, putting it back together, taking the baby out of their jacket/onesie and putting that back on, then baby back in the stroller, we definitely held up the line with all of that.

I agree that the extra carry-ons are part of the problem (and as the checked luggage fees increased, more people opted to carry on), but also fewer employees hurts too. Certainly my local airport security area seems to be only half-staffed most of the time (half the lanes are closed). Add to that the taking off the shoes, belts, jackets, lots of stuff that has been added in over the years, and the new scanners that take extra time and half the volume (one scanner for two lines that used to have a metal detector for each line). It all adds up.
 
Dec 12, 2014
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Over the course of the 5 years, Pre-Check comes out to $17 per year. Considering all the trivial things most of us waste money on throughout the year, this is a good investment even if you only fly once a year. Definitely worth having extra time & a lot less stress every time you go to the airport
 
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May 24, 2016
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I flew out of MCO on 5/22, hit the TSA lines at 6am, they were very long, we did have JetBlue Even more Speed, but that only eliminated the line to check boarding passes and id. Once past the id check, they treated every single person in line as if they had precheck. No shoes or jackets off, nothing taken out of bags. They did have an area with a dog that the line circled around. Not even sure why they had a precheck line in this case.
 
May 24, 2016
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Precheck and Global Entry sadly fails to include all people.

In the 1980s when I was in college, I did some college guy things and got in trouble with the law. I recall having to go to court and paying a $100 fine and the case was continued without a finding.

In those days, and up until about 2004 or so when Bush made up some laws about people with past offenses no longer being able to get into Canada (I dont know the specifics of this but it did effect a lot of people), when such a case was over it was over. And society encouraged people to forget and move on.

I never experienced any blockages in travel but I did hear stories of people having issues, like the now executive of a software company who smoked a joint in the 1970s now being denied entry to Canada even though he had been flying there for business for decades.

Then one day I used a credit card perk to pay $100 for Global Entey and I was denied. The Logan Airport Boston, MA agent told me to clean up my CORI. Until that day I didnt even know what CORI was. But I figured out what to do and did so. After months of going backwards in time and contacting courts etc, I found the case and had it closed at the state level. Who knew.

I applied again. Denied. It may be off my CORI but the federal level can see it.

I am deemed not a "safe traveler" because I stole flag from a hotel when in college more than three decades (30 years) ago! The police let me drive home and said I would be summonds to court and probably have to pay a fine. I wasnt arrested. I long since paid for this infraction.

Huh?

The agent at my second Global Entey hearing told me it wouldnt be fair to give it to me if everyone else who never commited a crime gets the service. The fact Ive traveled the world for years before trying to obtain this service didnt matter to him.

I still travel everywhere. My family has Global Entry--even the kids. But I cannot get it. I have petitioned the state for ways to remove this old case and cited this problem.

There will be people who claim this is right and fair. These folks are uninformed and not so swift when it comes to reality.
 
May 24, 2016
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I travel for business, but only two or three times a year. Seeing the lines at Miami International was enough to convince me I needed to sign up, even though the interview place was over 100 miles away. Over the course of 5 years, $85 is not much. That said, i wonder if everyone signs up for Pre will it just cause more congestion in those lines if they don't add more Pre lines or more personnel to handle the load.
 
May 24, 2016
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yes, once everyone signs up it will almost be better to NOT have the service because the old regular lines will become faster. It is then when I will finally be at ease with my issue lol
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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With the issues now with TSA being short handed even having pre check doesn't guarantee short lines. The TSA precheck lines at JFK recently were over 2 hours long, and non precheck were longer. Oir Check in girl at Delta told us that even precheck clients have been missing flights.

Get to the airport at least 3 hours before your flight.
 
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May 24, 2016
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3hrs can work... if you work for yourself and can do so from a phone or tablet. It fails to work if you have to be at your office or if you have a family with little kids and dont really love being in a bloated shopping mall with security everywhere spending time and money on stuff you wish they did not want. If the airports had a kids amusement park inside, we would get there 5 hrs in advance but they do not and cannot, so it is very painful to miss work and go crazy. Solution: work for yourself, have a big wallet and do not have kids, right?
 
Aug 29, 2015
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Precheck and Global Entry sadly fails to include all people.



"...In those days, and up until about 2004 or so when Bush made up some laws about people with past offenses no longer being able to get into Canada (I dont know the specifics of this but it did effect a lot of people), when such a case was over it was over. And society encouraged people to forget and move on...."
"W" did some questionable things while in office but I can't imagine that he had the power to keep people out of Canada - - that would be entirely up to the Canadians. What you may be referring to was that during his administration, and after 9/11/2001, the sharing of information between the FBI and its Canadian counterpart was stepped up, which had the result of stopping people with convictions for certain crimes at the border, by Canadian Immigration authorities.
 
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May 17, 2016
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My husband and I got Global Entry (which includes TSA Pre) a couple of years ago, and are very glad we did! A yearly trip abroad and several trips a year inside the US with less hassle are worth every penny. That said, we rarely travel out of huge airports (mostly PBI and HPN), and sail through the checkpoints.
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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3hrs can work... if you work for yourself and can do so from a phone or tablet. It fails to work if you have to be at your office or if you have a family with little kids and dont really love being in a bloated shopping mall with security everywhere spending time and money on stuff you wish they did not want. If the airports had a kids amusement park inside, we would get there 5 hrs in advance but they do not and cannot, so it is very painful to miss work and go crazy. Solution: work for yourself, have a big wallet and do not have kids, right?
Absolutely not. Our clients will work half a day when they are flying to make sure they don't have to worry.

If you miss your flight because you couldn't get through security on time and it costs you to rebook, it is much worse than having to sit for 2 hours (once you get through security) running after kids because you DID allow plenty of time.

If you don't get to the airport on time most airline make you pay for new tickets us a change fee. It just cost four of my clients $1000 in change fees because they didn't get to the airport early enough - I told them 3 hours, they didn't listen and were closed out of check one hour before.
 
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Oct 28, 2015
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I normally scoff at stuff like Pre-Check, mostly because I don't believe it will ever work right. But United gave me Pre-Check for a couple of years and I couldn't WAIT to sign up when TSA started phasing out the airline involvement. The freedom from the shoes, the laptop, the BS ... I'd pay $85 a YEAR for it.
Can you explain why do we have to pay for that all. Isn't it a function of government to organize the society and run the necessary checks for which they already collect general taxes.
After-all - it is not a private benefit alone. All benefit from the check and pre-check -- including people and property that never leaves the ground.
The check and pre-check protects more people and property on the ground than in the airplane.
Shouldn't all people who allow invasion of their privacy and subject themselves to the pre-check qualifying process be paid in some way instead of having to pay for it?
I do realize that many will miss the foregoing point.