Trouble with Chase United Airlines Explorer Credit Card

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Mar 14, 2020
5
1
3
65
San Francisco, CA
I recently moved to San Francisco & decided to sign up for the United Airlines Chase Explorer Credit Card. I had lived in Chicago for many years & have a Citibank American airlines Mastercard. My credit line with Citibank is $35,000 & my APR is 14.24. So, I was surprised when I signed up for the Chase card to find out that the credit line was $5000 with an APR of 24.99 (there was a range between 17.99 & 24.99 & I was assigned the highest amount. I have received a run-around from everyone I have spoken with. The 1st supervisor told me it was because of my income & Equifax credit report. My income is very good & there are no blemishes on my credit report. He also said it was because of my credit score. I wrote to the contacts on your website -- Deborah Walden, Nancy Stoneman & finally the CEO, Jamie Dimon. I have had staff from the Executive Offices call & provide me with generic responses. Supposedly a person has reviewed my credit report & credit score (the credit score is 824 which according to Equifax is considered exceptional. However, I'm only given generic responses such as: a) The # of accounts I have open & available to use (I have one credit card -- the citibank mentioned above which is paid in full; an auto loan through Bank of America which is paid off & my mortgage). b) The amount of available credit c) Payment history of any accounts with Chase (this one is interesting as I have no accounts with Chase. None are listed on my credit report. I may have had some in the 90s, but none currently). d) I was also told that I have yet to establish a "relationship" with Chase. As they will be lending me $ with the credit card, Chase doesn't not know if I'm a good credit risk. All I have asked now, multiple times, is what is in my credit history or other information that Chase has obtained that has determined my credit worthiness is only good for $5000 at an APR of 24.99 While I've been told that a person personally reviewed my information, no one can provide the specific reasons. This I have been told is proprietary information (even though it is all of my data) & I am not entitled to know.


What's your desired resolution? 1) An answer to my question (specific not the generic responses that I've been receiving)-- what is in my credit history or other information that Chase has obtained that has determined my credit worthiness is only good for $5000 at an APR of 24.99 2) I'm happy to advocate for myself but now not sure where to turn. I've hit a circuitous route with your contacts -- it's the same people in the Executive Offices who provide the generic responses. I've tried to post on your forums but can't get the confirmation email to complete my registration. So, how I can get an answer to my question.
 
Apr 10, 2017
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What's your desired resolution? 1) An answer to my question (specific not the generic responses that I've been receiving)-- what is in my credit history or other information that Chase has obtained that has determined my credit worthiness is only good for $5000 at an APR of 24.99 2) I'm happy to advocate for myself but now not sure where to turn. I've hit a circuitous route with your contacts -- it's the same people in the Executive Offices who provide the generic responses. I've tried to post on your forums but can't get the confirmation email to complete my registration. So, how I can get an answer to my question.
In my own, very personal opinion, you have received all the answer that you are going to get. If you've written to Jamie Dimon, nobody below him (the entire company) will do anything. Their decision-making algorithm is proprietary. Use the card, build up a history with them, ask for a credit line increase in a year.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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I do not think that a credit card company will ever tell how they decide what the algorithm is. I would suspect the fact that you have the potential to spend $35,000 on one card is a major concern — even though it is paid off the potential is there. The bank (Chase) may have rules about available credit — that is unrelated to credit score. They may have had a lot of charge offs during the recession.

Are you planning for large purchase or to carry a large balance?
 
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BittyBoo

Jul 30, 2018
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866
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I agree with my fellow forum friends: you will not likely be given a specific answer as to how they determined the credit line amount you were granted. The algorithms that the bank uses in their screening process is considered proprietary and they risk revealing information about it if they make any details public. Additionally, if such information is made public than other applicants can use it to skew their applications so they can avoid triggering such an algorithm. Its akin to Facebook banning an account: they only answer they provide to the now-banned member is that there was a "violation of terms and conditions ". If they said exactly what violated the t & c's then others can circumvent their algorithms.

Credit cards that earn airline miles have large annual fees. If the card isn't going to meet your needs than why not take your consumer dollars elsewhere and find one that does?
 
Mar 23, 2019
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Seems that you just don't have enough credit utilization. Are you actually using the 35K limit? Or just putting the occasional low dollar purchase on it? Try using 70-80% of the Chase card each month. That should be easy with such a low limit. Paying it off is fine, but you have to actually use the card for your account to be worthwhile for Chase.
 
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JVillegirl541

Verified Member
Nov 21, 2014
3,924
4,032
113
This is a Thin Credit Profile if the OP really only has 2 open credit lines.
1) Citi CC
2) Mortgage
Closed Auto Loan
So if I’m reading this correctly, just 2 open Accts. And my next question is Age of Accts.? How old is the Citi Card and how old is your credit profile in general.
While your FICO 8 score may be good, the Lender looks at the Depth of Credit history over time, utilization (you are not a credit user) and many other factors.
My fellow posters are correct Chase will never share what combination if data they use to determine what credit they offer and why they made the decision they did.
Hope this is helpful.
 
Mar 14, 2020
5
1
3
65
San Francisco, CA
This is a Thin Credit Profile if the OP really only has 2 open credit lines.
1) Citi CC
2) Mortgage
Closed Auto Loan
So if I’m reading this correctly, just 2 open Accts. And my next question is Age of Accts.? How old is the Citi Card and how old is your credit profile in general.
While your FICO 8 score may be good, the Lender looks at the Depth of Credit history over time, utilization (you are not a credit user) and many other factors.
My fellow posters are correct Chase will never share what combination if data they use to determine what credit they offer and why they made the decision they did.
Hope this is helpful.
Ciibank card is from 2007. Car loan since 2015 Mortgage since 2017
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,008
22,965
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
We still can’t tell you why they are doing what they did and as my colleagues have noted- they will never tell you why they gave you what they gave you. Do you pay your card off in full every month?
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
9,730
10,524
113
San Francisco
Yup, you'll never know. They won't tell you anything ... they pass down the information they wish you to have, and you acknowledge it, that's the extent of your communication. It seems pretty obvious to me that a move across the country, a new job, a new house and no relationship with Chase would make them reluctant to grant you much. I'd keep the UA card usage manageable and pay the bill every month to not incur those horrendous charges. After you've been at your residence and job for a year or two, ask Chase for an increase in the credit limit. I have no idea how the interest rates are "allotted" to people, but hopefully you could get that adjusted as well. Good luck and please enjoy our "shelter at home" protocol.
 
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May 30, 2019
383
771
93
I recently moved to San Francisco & decided to sign up for the United Airlines Chase Explorer Credit Card. I had lived in Chicago for many years & have a Citibank American airlines Mastercard. My credit line with Citibank is $35,000 & my APR is 14.24. So, I was surprised when I signed up for the Chase card to find out that the credit line was $5000 with an APR of 24.99 (there was a range between 17.99 & 24.99 & I was assigned the highest amount. I have received a run-around from everyone I have spoken with. The 1st supervisor told me it was because of my income & Equifax credit report. My income is very good & there are no blemishes on my credit report. He also said it was because of my credit score. I wrote to the contacts on your website -- Deborah Walden, Nancy Stoneman & finally the CEO, Jamie Dimon. I have had staff from the Executive Offices call & provide me with generic responses. Supposedly a person has reviewed my credit report & credit score (the credit score is 824 which according to Equifax is considered exceptional. However, I'm only given generic responses such as: a) The # of accounts I have open & available to use (I have one credit card -- the citibank mentioned above which is paid in full; an auto loan through Bank of America which is paid off & my mortgage). b) The amount of available credit c) Payment history of any accounts with Chase (this one is interesting as I have no accounts with Chase. None are listed on my credit report. I may have had some in the 90s, but none currently). d) I was also told that I have yet to establish a "relationship" with Chase. As they will be lending me $ with the credit card, Chase doesn't not know if I'm a good credit risk. All I have asked now, multiple times, is what is in my credit history or other information that Chase has obtained that has determined my credit worthiness is only good for $5000 at an APR of 24.99 While I've been told that a person personally reviewed my information, no one can provide the specific reasons. This I have been told is proprietary information (even though it is all of my data) & I am not entitled to know.

What's your desired resolution? 1) An answer to my question (specific not the generic responses that I've been receiving)-- what is in my credit history or other information that Chase has obtained that has determined my credit worthiness is only good for $5000 at an APR of 24.99 2) I'm happy to advocate for myself but now not sure where to turn. I've hit a circuitous route with your contacts -- it's the same people in the Executive Offices who provide the generic responses. I've tried to post on your forums but can't get the confirmation email to complete my registration. So, how I can get an answer to my question.
I'm not a bank ... Noting that, based on what you wrote, here are some factual and potentially negative considerations that are not necessarily tied to your FICO*:
a) Fact: The # of accounts you have open is small. This suggests you don't know how to manage credit.
b) Potential (b/c we don't know your income): Your credit line with Citibank is $35k, which could be a high unsecured credit line compared to your income.
c) Potential (again b/c we don't know income): Your Debt To Income ratio is high.
d) Potential: You applied using a method that they believe is higher risk. Yeah, that's a thing with some credit card banks.
e) Fact: No history with Chase. Some banks offer more credit to people who have a savings account with them.
f) Potential: Max credit used. Even though you paid off your Citibank card, if at one point you used most of your credit line, that does not affect your FICO score but does get viewed negatively by some card issuers.
g) Potential: You applied on a day when the stock market crashed. Yeah, that's also a thing with some credit card banks.

* I'm presuming your 824 is a FICO score and not a "TransVantage" or some other scoring method. Typically, card issuers use only the FICO score.

Bottom line ... There are criteria the banks use that is proprietary that won't be shared with you. They also can have funky criteria to close an existing card:
 
Mar 14, 2020
5
1
3
65
San Francisco, CA
I'm not a bank ... Noting that, based on what you wrote, here are some factual and potentially negative considerations that are not necessarily tied to your FICO*:
a) Fact: The # of accounts you have open is small. This suggests you don't know how to manage credit.
b) Potential (b/c we don't know your income): Your credit line with Citibank is $35k, which could be a high unsecured credit line compared to your income.
c) Potential (again b/c we don't know income): Your Debt To Income ratio is high.
d) Potential: You applied using a method that they believe is higher risk. Yeah, that's a thing with some credit card banks.
e) Fact: No history with Chase. Some banks offer more credit to people who have a savings account with them.
f) Potential: Max credit used. Even though you paid off your Citibank card, if at one point you used most of your credit line, that does not affect your FICO score but does get viewed negatively by some card issuers.
g) Potential: You applied on a day when the stock market crashed. Yeah, that's also a thing with some credit card banks.

* I'm presuming your 824 is a FICO score and not a "TransVantage" or some other scoring method. Typically, card issuers use only the FICO score.

Bottom line ... There are criteria the banks use that is proprietary that won't be shared with you. They also can have funky criteria to close an existing card:
Thanks for the feedback. I've begun using the card & will pay off the balance monthly.
 
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