September prepaid trip to Italy on Trafalgar tours

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Jul 10, 2020
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We had air/bus tour/prepaid tips/cancel for any reason insurance prepaid in full to Trafalgar tours last December for a September 14, 2020 departure. We cancelled by e-mail on Mar 15 around the time Italy shut down due to the covid virus. We are approaching 80 years old and will not be travelling to Europe again. Trafalgar says they are processing refunds based on departure date. Is there anything we could/should be doing other than waiting?
 

justlisa

Feb 12, 2019
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Are you past final payment for your trip? I don't think Trafalgar is offering refunds if you are, so I would make sure that you don't have to submit a claim for your CFAR policy to get a refund if that's the case.
 

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
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What are the terms of your contract? Did it allow for cancellation with refund if you cancelled on March 15th? If not, then you should do as @justlisa suggested and contact your insurance company and file a claim.
 
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Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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Trafalgar and many others are refunding by date order. Since it’s only July, your travel date hasn’t even come yet so the refund may not be there for awhile.

Was there any cancellation fees for canceling?
 
Jul 22, 2020
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Trafalgar now won't let you cancel a trip scheduled for this year (through the end of November). They have "suspended" tours for that time period. I have a trip slated for early October, and when I tried to cancel, they said I was only eligible for the Extended Travel Credit, which they gave me without even asking me if I wanted it. I've never seen such a runaround.
 

Neil Maley

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The problem is Italy (and much of the EU) have enacted laws saying that hotels do not have to provide a refund for canceled stays so it’s likely that Trafalgar can’t get a refund to give you your money back.
 
Jul 22, 2020
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And their bottom line is more important than individual travelers' finances? Many of their customers are well past retirement age and are not likely to feel safe traveling for a very long time.
 
Feb 24, 2018
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And their bottom line is more important than individual travelers' finances? Many of their customers are well past retirement age and are not likely to feel safe traveling for a very long time.
I'm afraid that this thought process very much oversimplifies the problem caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Companies are not refusing to refund because they consider their "bottom lines" more important than "individual travelers' finances," which implies that they are valuing their profit margins over the financial health of their customers. This is simply not the case. The grim reality is that this is about these companies' survival, and with it their ability to employ many people, and people must be employed for a country to have an economy. On the flip side, and I hate to be blunt, what their customers stand to lose is, by definition, disposal income (or, I acknowledge, what was disposal income before the pandemic). Nobody, no one at all, is winning here.

What countries that are allowing these companies not to refund have decided is that it is more important to keep companies afloat and people employed- and a ripple effect of immeasurable proportions of families able to keep food on the table and roofs over the head- than to force them into bankruptcy to return the money people had to go on vacation, which was not being used to pay for life's essentials. Yes, it is bitterly unfair that hardworking people have to lose out on their own hard-earned money, but someone had to lose, and these countries have decided where that loss should fall in the interest of keeping their economies viable which will, quite literally, save lives.

I realize this doesn't "help" our OP in the sense that it brings her no closer to a refund, but I hope it helps bring understanding of why these decisions are being made. No one wants the OP to miss out, but these are larger scale decisions being made for long-term survival. With tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of people in the OP's position, there just isn't room for exceptions.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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I'm afraid that this thought process very much oversimplifies the problem caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Companies are not refusing to refund because they consider their "bottom lines" more important than "individual travelers' finances," which implies that they are valuing their profit margins over the financial health of their customers. This is simply not the case. The grim reality is that this is about these companies' survival, and with it their ability to employ many people, and people must be employed for a country to have an economy. On the flip side, and I hate to be blunt, what their customers stand to lose is, by definition, disposal income (or, I acknowledge, what was disposal income before the pandemic). Nobody, no one at all, is winning here.

What countries that are allowing these companies not to refund have decided is that it is more important to keep companies afloat and people employed- and a ripple effect of immeasurable proportions of families able to keep food on the table and roofs over the head- than to force them into bankruptcy to return the money people had to go on vacation, which was not being used to pay for life's essentials. Yes, it is bitterly unfair that hardworking people have to lose out on their own hard-earned money, but someone had to lose, and these countries have decided where that loss should fall in the interest of keeping their economies viable which will, quite literally, save lives.

I realize this doesn't "help" our OP in the sense that it brings her no closer to a refund, but I hope it helps bring understanding of why these decisions are being made. No one wants the OP to miss out, but these are larger scale decisions being made for long-term survival. With tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of people in the OP's position, there just isn't room for exceptions.
Never has "we're all in this together" been more apt. Businesses of all sizes must prioritize their solvency above anything else. With the exception of someone who has lived in a cave eating nuts and berries for years, every human being on earth is suffering from this virus disaster. As the lockdowns continue, I am truly worried that our way of life may be over forever. We have no idea what goes into the politicians mandates and no idea if they're making the right decisions. Is it better to save some humans from the virus, or is it better to save the economy? I am uncomfortable with the vision of a majority of the population without work, who can't feed their children.
 
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Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
1,926
3,546
113
I'm afraid that this thought process very much oversimplifies the problem caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Companies are not refusing to refund because they consider their "bottom lines" more important than "individual travelers' finances," which implies that they are valuing their profit margins over the financial health of their customers. This is simply not the case. The grim reality is that this is about these companies' survival, and with it their ability to employ many people, and people must be employed for a country to have an economy. On the flip side, and I hate to be blunt, what their customers stand to lose is, by definition, disposal income (or, I acknowledge, what was disposal income before the pandemic). Nobody, no one at all, is winning here.

What countries that are allowing these companies not to refund have decided is that it is more important to keep companies afloat and people employed- and a ripple effect of immeasurable proportions of families able to keep food on the table and roofs over the head- than to force them into bankruptcy to return the money people had to go on vacation, which was not being used to pay for life's essentials. Yes, it is bitterly unfair that hardworking people have to lose out on their own hard-earned money, but someone had to lose, and these countries have decided where that loss should fall in the interest of keeping their economies viable which will, quite literally, save lives.

I realize this doesn't "help" our OP in the sense that it brings her no closer to a refund, but I hope it helps bring understanding of why these decisions are being made. No one wants the OP to miss out, but these are larger scale decisions being made for long-term survival. With tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of people in the OP's position, there just isn't room for exceptions.
Well said!!!
 
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