Qantas won't help us after delaying our baggage 6 of our 8 vacation days to Sydney.

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VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
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the United States
Oh I see what you mean. Yes, she has kept it in her purse in previous travels and gotten in terrible for it by TSA. She has done both, kept it in her purse or carry-on luggage. So I will get the kit and hopefully that being in her purse will have no issue with TSA and she can keep it under the seat in front of her. I have to check if she's keeping the label on her meds or taking it off, because as mentioned in the forum she should keep the labels on it. I know we've told her this before... she doesn't always listen to our advice, but I think its time she starts.

Thanks again for the help.
I was referring to where she keeps it after she borads the plane. For TSA scanning, she should take it out and show it to them. They want to know specifically about medicines and have the opportunity to examine the contents. If it's in her purse when she places it on the belt, that will upset them . . .
 
Aug 23, 2019
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I was referring to where she keeps it after she borads the plane. For TSA scanning, she should take it out and show it to them. They want to know specifically about medicines and have the opportunity to examine the contents. If it's in her purse when she places it on the belt, that will upset them . . .
Oh, yes definitely I agree. She knows she must take out her meds at TSA scanning, so no doubt she will pull it out of her purse/carryon at that point. In my statement above, I was also referring to keeping it in front of her after boarding. Thanks for making sure we were on the same page.
 
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Jun 24, 2019
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OP's original post was about the late delivery of her luggage and the difficulty of getting recompense from Qantas. It really does not matter what she had in her luggage for that inquiry. From my recent experience, she should keep after Qantas, and, eventually, she will receive something. And if the first offer is perceived to be not enough, don't be embarassed to ask for more. Having been through this with Qantas, it takes time and perserverance. On the damaged luggage, it took us 3 months from original complaint to wired funds. (Qantas insists on wiring funds, even though the outgoing wire on the damaged luggage came from a third party agent located just off LAX.)

OP's relative was reacting to prior TSA hassles when she packed away her medicine. While we understand that medicine and valuables should never be placed in luggage, I think the reaction was natural, especially by someone who flies infrequently and usually has her luggage appear on the baggage carousel. Moreover, one can carefully pack medicine and valuables in carry-on luggage only to be told that space is at a premium and it needs to be gate checked. (To be sure, when I've run into that problem I've pulled my laptop/kindle/iPad, even though I'm now holding up boarding.)

The problem would have been solved if Qantas (or perhaps AA) actually delivered the luggage timely. A six day delay for luggage which is not lost and has not been shipped to the wrong airport is simply inexcusable. Qantas operates daily non-stop service from SFO to SYD. As Flip Wilson might have said, "If you can find Sydney Airport in the dark, you can find my luggage."
 
Aug 23, 2019
17
4
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OP's original post was about the late delivery of her luggage and the difficulty of getting recompense from Qantas. It really does not matter what she had in her luggage for that inquiry. From my recent experience, she should keep after Qantas, and, eventually, she will receive something. And if the first offer is perceived to be not enough, don't be embarassed to ask for more. Having been through this with Qantas, it takes time and perserverance. On the damaged luggage, it took us 3 months from original complaint to wired funds. (Qantas insists on wiring funds, even though the outgoing wire on the damaged luggage came from a third party agent located just off LAX.)

OP's relative was reacting to prior TSA hassles when she packed away her medicine. While we understand that medicine and valuables should never be placed in luggage, I think the reaction was natural, especially by someone who flies infrequently and usually has her luggage appear on the baggage carousel. Moreover, one can carefully pack medicine and valuables in carry-on luggage only to be told that space is at a premium and it needs to be gate checked. (To be sure, when I've run into that problem I've pulled my laptop/kindle/iPad, even though I'm now holding up boarding.)

The problem would have been solved if Qantas (or perhaps AA) actually delivered the luggage timely. A six day delay for luggage which is not lost and has not been shipped to the wrong airport is simply inexcusable. Qantas operates daily non-stop service from SFO to SYD. As Flip Wilson might have said, "If you can find Sydney Airport in the dark, you can find my luggage."
Thank you. I really do appreciate your thoughts on my situation.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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In the US it is state by state on getting needles without a rx
https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/policy/RetailSaleOfSyringes.

Some states have limits without a rx

Some states prohibit the sale outright -- so you may have been given the correct information about some US states depending on where the pharmacist was located.

I apologize if what I wrote was misunderstood. I am writing in the respect of what we thought during our trip. I did ask people back in the states that are pharmacists if we can get the needles without a prescription and I was told no. We did not have her prescription on hand during our trip, hence why I said we can't get needles without prescription. Believe me, we would of had no issue in paying for needles if we thought that what was all that it would take to get some. We paid plenty on this trip to try to get what was needed, so while I appreciate the help provided by this forum, I do not appreciate you implying I am changing my responses due to having to pay for needles. We did not have her prescription so we could not show it in Sydney. We waited each day hoping it would arrive the next day to the Sydney airport just like it did on 8/8 6am even though on 8/7 around 10pm SFO time I was told there was no update on our bags and they did not know if our bags got on that flight. Btw the SFO flight leaves at 10:25pm so at the time I was asking Qantas, the bags had to have been on that flight in order to have reached SYD at 6am on 8/8.
Diabetes is a challenging disease.

In some countries pharmacists are able to provide certain important medications (usually non narcotic) at their discretion. Others are very rigid, and of course there is the problem of finding the exact same insulin formula --

The missing baggage must of been stressful. The Montreal Convention sets limits for reimbursement for delayed and lost baggage -- about $1600 per person. You should send all of your receipts.

You certainly had the misfortune to be on a delayed flight from ORD to SFO -- two airports that are often under sir traffic control limitations. Was it a weather or ATC delay? My local airports are also in the lists of the airports with the most delayed flights so I understand the missed connection from the late outbound.

Write to the airline with a list and with receipts.
 
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Aug 23, 2019
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In the US it is state by state on getting needles without a rx
https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/policy/RetailSaleOfSyringes.

Some states have limits without a rx

Some states prohibit the sale outright -- so you may have been given the correct information about some US states depending on where the pharmacist was located.



Diabetes is a challenging disease.

In some countries pharmacists are able to provide certain important medications (usually non narcotic) at their discretion. Others are very rigid, and of course there is the problem of finding the exact same insulin formula --

The missing baggage must of been stressful. The Montreal Convention sets limits for reimbursement for delayed and lost baggage -- about $1600 per person. You should send all of your receipts.

You certainly had the misfortune to be on a delayed flight from ORD to SFO -- two airports that are often under sir traffic control limitations. Was it a weather or ATC delay? My local airports are also in the lists of the airports with the most delayed flights so I understand the missed connection from the late outbound.

Write to the airline with a list and with receipts.
Thank you for your help. No weather-related day. Supposedly ORD delay was bc AA found a non-emergent small crack in cargo hold which maintenance was fixing after us waiting some time to initally assess, and about 2.5 hours later they announced the maintenance crew disappeared with the log book, and then the pilots timed out so they deplaned us eventually and we waited to reload after new pilots were found.
 
Sep 19, 2015
5,589
8,381
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Thank you for your help. No weather-related day. Supposedly ORD delay was bc AA found a non-emergent small crack in cargo hold which maintenance was fixing after us waiting some time to initally assess, and about 2.5 hours later they announced the maintenance crew disappeared with the log book, and then the pilots timed out so they deplaned us eventually and we waited to reload after new pilots were found.
Ugh. Did AA ever provide accommodations? If not, I would write to them about that issue. From their webpage:

When your flight is canceled or a delay will cause you to miss your connection, we will rebook you on our next flight with available seats. If the delay or cancellation was caused by events within our control or you were diverted to another city, and we don’t board to your final destination before 11:59 p.m. local time, we'll arrange an overnight stay at your connecting airport, if available.

If the delay or cancellation is caused by events beyond our control (like weather) you are responsible for your own overnight accommodations, meals and incidental expenses. American Airlines agents may be able to help you find a hotel.


https://www.aa.com/i18n/customer-service/support/customer-service-plan.jsp

And write to Qantas about the expenses for the delayed baggage reimbursement.

Good luck.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
2,933
3,814
113
Maui Hawaii
Since this post started with a baggage issue, I am going to provide a summary of issues related to the patient with diabetes who is traveling. This summary is from the perspective of someone who practiced medicine for 50 years and was trained in endocrinology.

Fortunately, the OP's mother-in-law was treated with insulin, as opposed to being insulin-requiring (a very big difference-see below). Nonetheless, any diabetic patient who is treated with insulin needs to carry insulin, syringes, glucose meter (if needed) and current prescriptions for all diabetic-related medications on their person in a bag that cannot be checked (even gate checked). All medications (of any type) should have their original labels from the pharmacy attached. A letter from the patient's MD certifying the medical need to carry these medications on their person is a good idea to have as well. One should also take a double supply of all medications to take into account possible travel delays, etc.

Carrying a printed copy of these two policies is also a good idea: https://www.tsa.gov/blog/2014/09/05/tsa-travel-tips-traveling-medication
https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/unused-syringes

When traveling domestically, one can usually get a supply of needed medications (except for narcotics) by visiting a pharmacy where you are traveling and having the pharmacist contact your home pharmacy where your prescriptions are regularly filled. This would apply to insulin and syringes.

When traveling internationally this will not work. You need to have everything with you (and include extra back-up supplies) because medications used in the US may not be available outside the US. Especially on a cruise, you may not have access to any of your regular medications in the ship's pharmacy. Medications should never be in checked luggage.

Having said this, a visit to a local pharmacy outside the US and a discussion with the pharmacist would likely allow one to obtain an emergency supply of insulin and syringes to tide you over.

An insulin-treated person can potentially go for some time using non-insulin medications to control blood sugar.

An insulin-requiring person can become very ill within less than a day without insulin, and may need emergency hospital treatment. Lack of insulin in an insulin DEPENDENT patient can lead to serious illnesses (including death) if not treated promptly.
 

VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
3,453
4,220
113
the United States
Since this post started with a baggage issue, I am going to provide a summary of issues related to the patient with diabetes who is traveling. This summary is from the perspective of someone who practiced medicine for 50 years and was trained in endocrinology.

Fortunately, the OP's mother-in-law was treated with insulin, as opposed to being insulin-requiring (a very big difference-see below). Nonetheless, any diabetic patient who is treated with insulin needs to carry insulin, syringes, glucose meter (if needed) and current prescriptions for all diabetic-related medications on their person in a bag that cannot be checked (even gate checked). All medications (of any type) should have their original labels from the pharmacy attached. A letter from the patient's MD certifying the medical need to carry these medications on their person is a good idea to have as well. One should also take a double supply of all medications to take into account possible travel delays, etc.

Carrying a printed copy of these two policies is also a good idea: https://www.tsa.gov/blog/2014/09/05/tsa-travel-tips-traveling-medication
https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/unused-syringes

When traveling domestically, one can usually get a supply of needed medications (except for narcotics) by visiting a pharmacy where you are traveling and having the pharmacist contact your home pharmacy where your prescriptions are regularly filled. This would apply to insulin and syringes.

When traveling internationally this will not work. You need to have everything with you (and include extra back-up supplies) because medications used in the US may not be available outside the US. Especially on a cruise, you may not have access to any of your regular medications in the ship's pharmacy. Medications should never be in checked luggage.

Having said this, a visit to a local pharmacy outside the US and a discussion with the pharmacist would likely allow one to obtain an emergency supply of insulin and syringes to tide you over.

An insulin-treated person can potentially go for some time using non-insulin medications to control blood sugar.

An insulin-requiring person can become very ill within less than a day without insulin, and may need emergency hospital treatment. Lack of insulin in an insulin DEPENDENT patient can lead to serious illnesses (including death) if not treated promptly.
In view of that, does it make sense to carry 2 kits in the unlikely event a traveler is stranded outside the US for a period of time?
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
2,933
3,814
113
Maui Hawaii
In view of that, does it make sense to carry 2 kits in the unlikely event a traveler is stranded outside the US for a period of time?
I would not necessarily carry two kits if traveling to a first-world location (like Australia), but I would take twice the anticipated needed supply. If traveling to a third-world location, I would carry 2 (or 3). For older patients with complex medical issues, third-world locations maybe should be visited by video.
 

VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
3,453
4,220
113
the United States
I would not necessarily carry two kits if traveling to a first-world location (like Australia), but I would take twice the anticipated needed supply. If traveling to a third-world location, I would carry 2 (or 3). For older patients with complex medical issues, third-world locations maybe should be visited by video.
Excellent. Thank you weihlac . . .
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
9,919
10,722
113
San Francisco
FOR OUR OTHER READERS Frequent travellers pack a full ensemble in their carryons. They also cross-pack with each other so that all is not lost if one of the bags disappears. If you need to carry important items through airport security and TSA gives you a bad time, don't just put them in your checked bag next trip. Look up the rules, print out a copy, and bring it with you to the airport. If your bags don't appear at your destination, file the reports, then go on with your vacation. It does little good to waste hours trying to find them, especially with a code-share flight. The airline will find them and deliver them, or they won't. There's little that a traveller can do to help the situation. Make one trip to the local big-box store, buy your necessities and get on with that vacation. As one of our colleagues famously posted a couple of years ago, "When I pack my bag, I assume that I'll never see any of that stuff again". That's a good attitude to have so you don't return from a trip frustrated and annoyed with all the time you didn't spend enjoying yourself.
 
Dec 20, 2018
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You might wish to get your mother-in-law an insulin travel kit that holds all of the needed supplies. These are readily available at pharmacies, on Amazon, etc. There is room to store insulin and syringes, a glucose meter, and a place to keep prescriptions and a doctors note. TSA should have no problem with this.
My husband is an insulin dependent diabetic, and this is what he uses as well when we fly. We've never had issues with TSA over the needles. Although granted, we've never flown internationally.
 
Jul 30, 2019
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FOR OUR OTHER READERS Frequent travellers pack a full ensemble in their carryons. They also cross-pack with each other so that all is not lost if one of the bags disappears. If you need to carry important items through airport security and TSA gives you a bad time, don't just put them in your checked bag next trip. Look up the rules, print out a copy, and bring it with you to the airport. If your bags don't appear at your destination, file the reports, then go on with your vacation. It does little good to waste hours trying to find them, especially with a code-share flight. The airline will find them and deliver them, or they won't. There's little that a traveller can do to help the situation. Make one trip to the local big-box store, buy your necessities and get on with that vacation. As one of our colleagues famously posted a couple of years ago, "When I pack my bag, I assume that I'll never see any of that stuff again". That's a good attitude to have so you don't return from a trip frustrated and annoyed with all the time you didn't spend enjoying yourself.
Perfectly written and very accurate. Anything of value stays with my body (I have fought hard to keep expensive camera gear filling an entire carry on from being taken out of the cabin and checked). At least one change of clothes and toiletries always comes on board with me and I have often had to use them. Everything else should be considered as potentially lost from the start.

Our luggage never got to us in Hawaii for a one-week trip. Our travel insurance and the airline both reimbursed and we had so much fun shopping for new bathing attire at the most adorable beach shops and we felt good contributing to the local economy. Do not underestimate the power of travel insurance to turn a nightmare into a happy experience.
 
Jul 30, 2019
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12
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OP's original post was about the late delivery of her luggage and the difficulty of getting recompense from Qantas. It really does not matter what she had in her luggage for that inquiry. From my recent experience, she should keep after Qantas, and, eventually, she will receive something. And if the first offer is perceived to be not enough, don't be embarassed to ask for more. Having been through this with Qantas, it takes time and perserverance. On the damaged luggage, it took us 3 months from original complaint to wired funds. (Qantas insists on wiring funds, even though the outgoing wire on the damaged luggage came from a third party agent located just off LAX.)

OP's relative was reacting to prior TSA hassles when she packed away her medicine. While we understand that medicine and valuables should never be placed in luggage, I think the reaction was natural, especially by someone who flies infrequently and usually has her luggage appear on the baggage carousel. Moreover, one can carefully pack medicine and valuables in carry-on luggage only to be told that space is at a premium and it needs to be gate checked. (To be sure, when I've run into that problem I've pulled my laptop/kindle/iPad, even though I'm now holding up boarding.)

The problem would have been solved if Qantas (or perhaps AA) actually delivered the luggage timely. A six day delay for luggage which is not lost and has not been shipped to the wrong airport is simply inexcusable. Qantas operates daily non-stop service from SFO to SYD. As Flip Wilson might have said, "If you can find Sydney Airport in the dark, you can find my luggage."
Very true. The lack of customer service is astounding. It seems we have to keep adjusting our expectations down to 0 and be prepared for the worst case scenario every time we fly.
 
Jan 28, 2019
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I think so. Airlines allow one "carry-on" plus (1) item that will "fit under the seat in front of you". It is that item (under the seat) that I suggest flyers user for their medicines and valuables.

We do see cases here where flyers are told to check their carry-ons, so the under-the-seat option will guarantee these critical items are not lost or delayed by the airline . . .
If flight attendants or gate staff are told that the bag contains medicine that may be needed in flight, they will usually let you keep your bag. Unless it is a small plane with small overhead space that will not accommodate a standard carry on. Thus the advice to put medicine in the small personal item.
 
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Jun 27, 2017
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My husband is an insulin-dependent Type 1 diabetic. He uses a diabetic travel organizer that safely stores his spare pump, pump supplies, test strips, syringes, insulin vials, etc. He has never had a problem getting through TSA domestically or security internationally. He does carry a note from his doctor and prescription info. Organizers of all sizes, shapes, styles are readily available on Amazon. He does keep his insulin cool, as he has had issues when kept at room temp. He packs his in an under-the-seat carry-on.