More thorough investigation by Pay Pal

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Oct 27, 2019
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You are referring to two-factor authentication. It is NOT required (many people do not have reliable cell phone access in the US or when abroad) but is offered by many if not most institutions but you must opt in.
I didn't know it was optional. Anyway, knowing that they exist and what they are for, lets you know what your weaknesses are.
 
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On November 21 I received an email from PayPal Executive Escalations where they indicate that my claim has been denied: Below is part of the communication referred:

“Mr Perez, I understand you are unhappy about an unauthorized claim you raised relating to a payment on your account that has been denied. A review of your account and the case in question shows that we were unable to determine your account had been accessed by an unauthorized third party. ”

“When a claim of this nature is raised with PayPal, we review all details of the account and the payment in question. We always look for any signs the account had been used by an unauthorized third party. In this instance, there was no outstanding evidence to indicate this was the case. Our review of your account showed the log in activity to be consistent which is why we could not grant you a refund. ”

With regard to the above, PAYPAL staff continues without answer me the following:

Why the PayPal computer system allows without there is no alert the following:

•That a user enters an account with an IP address and a device other than the one with which usually connect to.

•That a user, whose average payment, does not exceed $ 50 can make a $ 900 transaction.

•That user, 20 minutes after the transaction changes the password and security questions.

From the moment the account was charged and the moment I contacted PAYPAL, only 45 minutes passed and nothing could be done to reverse the transaction.

As obviously, it was not I who entered my account in PAYPAL, I would like to have an answer to the following questions, which only PAYPAL has, the answer:

• From which country was the connection to perform the transaction?

• Who owns the PayPal account where the money withdrawn from my account was transferred?

• If PAYPAL accounts are verified, what is the address of the person who received the money that was withdrawn from my account?

• What measures did PAYPAL take against the owner of the account who obtained money fraudulently??

I will continue to request for an answer to the questions shown above, I'll wait your suggestions and comments and from them the refund of my money
 

Skippy

May 30, 2019
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Why the PayPal computer system allows without there is no alert the following:
Some of the procedures you mention are options a customer can choose to include or suppress in their account. Or are you asking why PayPal didn't freeze it?

PayPal appears to think that the $900 transaction was not fraudulent. Why? When I'm in situations like this, I often try to rule out outlier possibilities. So I hope you understand if I ask ...
  • Did anyone other than you have access to your Paypal password, or was the login set for autocomplete on your computer? Did anyone other than you have access to your email account?
  • If you still have access to your account, or if the $900 transaction notification went to your email account, you should be able to see the recipient. Do you know where the money went to? If so, was it something familiar?
  • Do you have notifications set for your mobile phone? If so, did that provide some information?
 
Oct 27, 2019
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Some of the procedures you mention are options a customer can choose to include or suppress in their account. Or are you asking why PayPal didn't freeze it?

PayPal appears to think that the $900 transaction was not fraudulent. Why? When I'm in situations like this, I often try to rule out outlier possibilities. So I hope you understand if I ask ...
  • Did anyone other than you have access to your Paypal password, or was the login set for autocomplete on your computer? Did anyone other than you have access to your email account?
  • If you still have access to your account, or if the $900 transaction notification went to your email account, you should be able to see the recipient. Do you know where the money went to? If so, was it something familiar?
  • Do you have notifications set for your mobile phone? If so, did that provide some information?
Some of the procedures you mention are options a customer can choose to include or suppress in their account.

I did not know that multiple identity verification procedures were optional. Someone in the forum told me in a previous question. I remember that six months ago I traveled to Panama and did not take my cell line with me and bought a line there. Well, neither Amazon nor my bank in the US UU. They allowed me to connect online because I couldn't send the code to my cell phone and I don't remember it, but I don't think they asked me if I wanted it. I thought it was very good because I knew it was for safety.

PayPal seems to think that the $ 900 transaction was not fraudulent. Why?
I do not know.

Did anyone other than you have access to your PayPal Password?

It does not seem likely. I am retired and when I connect to the Internet I do it from my home. In my house I have a network of three PCs, one for me, one for my wife and one for my son.

Was the login set for autocomplete on your computer?

I always use the autocomplete feature of Google, but I have some passwords that are never saved. Those of my bank accounts, PayPal and my email.

Did anyone other than you have access to your email account?

I've thought a lot about that, trying to remember if I neglect at some point, but I don't remember it and on my computer the only ones who can see my account are my family.

If you still have access to your account, or if the $900 transaction notification went to your email account, you should be able to see the recipient. Do you know where the money went to? If so, was it something familiar?

The money was sent to a company called CAMPOS Y HARVEST LTD. I don't know that company and, apparently, searching online is in the UK. And the payment to that company was a partial payment since I still owe $ 80 for three 3D models that, in theory, I bought for a total amount of $ 980. I imagine that the rest of the payment was not sent because my PayPal account was blocked quickly I have sent several emails to that company (at the suggestion of PAYPAL staff) explaining the situation and requesting the money back, but I did not receive an answer.

Do you have notifications configured for your mobile phone? If so, did you provide any information?

If you mean PAYPAL without notifications, I did not receive any. In fact, as a result of this situation, I have tried to configure the sending of code to my cell phone in my PAYPAL account and I do not understand why I do not receive them. The PAYPAL system says it was sent. I have not tried to get help from PAYPAL because I asked for help setting up other things in my account and they did not respond. I don't understand what happens because, despite this situation, I have been very polite with the PAYPAL staff.
 

RLB

May 28, 2019
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Have you made internet purchases for large amounts (over $600) using Paypal in the past?
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,469
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www.promalvacations.com
Wait- you actually made a $980 purchase? You never mentioned a purchase near that amount.

“I still owe $ 80 for three 3D models that, in theory, I bought for a total amount of $ 980.”

Did the company you bought these through charge you again?
 
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Oct 27, 2019
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Have you made internet purchases for large amounts (over $600) using Paypal in the past?
When checking the history of my PayPal transactions since 2016 (maximum period that the system allows us to review), the maximum value is $ 50. And I don't think there is a value greater than that in previous years.
 
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Oct 27, 2019
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Wait- you actually made a $980 purchase? You never mentioned a purchase near that amount.

“I still owe $ 80 for three 3D models that, in theory, I bought for a total amount of $ 980.”

Did the company you bought these through charge you again?



Wait- you actually made a $980 purchase? You never mentioned a purchase near that amount.

Maybe I could not explain myself that is the transaction in dispute. What happens is that the amount in the PayPal account is 980 but only $ 900 is charged to my bank account and says I still owe $ 80.



I still owe $ 80 for three 3D models that, in theory, I bought for a total amount of $ 980. "

It is the detail that appears in my PayPal account of the transaction in dispute or not recognized by me. I shouldn't have used the word theory that is used more in Spanish; I should have used the word "hypothetical" or "supposed". I'm sorry.



Did the company you bought these through charge you again?

They haven't tried to charge me; I wish they did to tell them it was a fraudulent operation
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,469
23,434
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
The fraudulent purchase was 3 pieces of 3D models for a total amount of $ 980 of which 900 were charged to my account.
So you never made these three purchases. In the US we have a regulatory agency, the CFPB that you could have filed a complaint with about this. But you are in Venezuela and I’m not sure if you have anything of that sort in your country to file a complaint with.
 
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smd

Mar 14, 2018
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PayPal seems to think that the $ 900 transaction was not fraudulent. Why?
I do not know.

Did anyone other than you have access to your PayPal Password?

It does not seem likely. I am retired and when I connect to the Internet I do it from my home. In my house I have a network of three PCs, one for me, one for my wife and one for my son.
I'd assume the reason Paypal considers this transaction valid is that the person who initiated it logged into your account using the correct password.

Assuming you didn't provide your Paypal password to anyone, the most common ways this can happen are:

1) You used the same password on a different account and that other company was breached. Username/password combinations from breached accounts are widely available on the dark web. You should never reuse passwords between accounts for this reason. (Use a password manager instead.)​
2) You have malware installed on your computer that is recording keystrokes. You need to download something like malwarebytes and scan your computer.​
3) You logged into your Paypal account (or another account that uses the same password) from another computer that is infected with malware.​

If you haven't done so already, you really need to change all your passwords since you don't know the extent of the breach. Make sure you do this from a clean computer (eg scanned with malwarebytes) or you'll end up in the same place all over again...
 
Oct 27, 2019
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I'd assume the reason Paypal considers this transaction valid is that the person who initiated it logged into your account using the correct password.

Assuming you didn't provide your Paypal password to anyone, the most common ways this can happen are:

1) You used the same password on a different account and that other company was breached. Username/password combinations from breached accounts are widely available on the dark web. You should never reuse passwords between accounts for this reason. (Use a password manager instead.)​
2) You have malware installed on your computer that is recording keystrokes. You need to download something like malwarebytes and scan your computer.​
3) You logged into your Paypal account (or another account that uses the same password) from another computer that is infected with malware.​

If you haven't done so already, you really need to change all your passwords since you don't know the extent of the breach. Make sure you do this from a clean computer (eg scanned with malwarebytes) or you'll end up in the same place all over again...
I'd assume the reason Paypal considers this transaction valid is that the person who initiated it logged into your account using the correct password.

Yes I agree, but it is the events that occurred during the next hour that indicate that there was no authorization from me.

You used the same password on a different account and that other company was breached. Username / password combinations from breached accounts are widely available on the dark web. You should never reuse passwords between accounts for this reason. (Use a password manager instead.)

In my case to facilitate that I can remember the passwords I use a name and what I change are the numbers. I am going to have to start using a password manager.

You have malware installed on your computer that is recording keystrokes. You need to download something like malwarebytes and scan your computer.

I have installed the version of Malwarebites premiun 3.5.1


You logged into your Paypal account (or another account that uses the same password) from another computer that is infected with malware.

Maybe it's that explanation, but I don't remember if I did.


If you haven't done so already, you really need to change all your passwords since you don't know the extent of the breach. Make sure you do this from a clean computer (eg scanned with malwarebytes) or you'll end up in the same place all over again ...

I did that the same day after the unauthorized entry into my PAYPAL account and to have some peace of mind make the temporary block of the debit card and proceeded to cancel the credit card and at the moment I will not leave my numbers stored of cards in any of the companies for sale online. I will make the transaction and then delete it. It costs a lot to earn money to lose it so easy.
 
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So you never made these three purchases. In the US we have a regulatory agency, the CFPB that you could have filed a complaint with about this. But you are in Venezuela and I’m not sure if you have anything of that sort in your country to file a complaint with.


I have had a lot of work lately, however, online I have managed to file a complaint today, for the subtraction of the 900 dollars from my account, at the CFPB indicating the ID number of the COMPLAINT XXXXXX-XXXXXXX. And previous days I filed the complaint for identity theft in the Federal Trade Commission assigning the number XXXXXXXX
 

smd

Mar 14, 2018
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I have had a lot of work lately, however, online I have managed to file a complaint today, for the subtraction of the 900 dollars from my account, at the CFPB indicating the ID number of the COMPLAINT XXXXXX-XXXXXXX. And previous days I filed the complaint for identity theft in the Federal Trade Commission assigning the number XXXXXXXX
If you live in Venezuela, your account was with Paypal Pte. Ltd., a Singapore-based company. US government agencies, including the CFPB and the FTC, do not have jurisdiction over its actions.
 
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If you live in Venezuela, your account was with Paypal Pte. Ltd., a Singapore-based company. US government agencies, including the CFPB and the FTC, do not have jurisdiction over its actions.

Yes I am, I am currently living in Venezuela, I didn't know that my PayPal account is based in Singapore therebefore I can't understand why in the portals of both agencies of the United States I can enter all the residency data corresponding to other countries.
 

smd

Mar 14, 2018
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Yes I am, I am currently living in Venezuela, I didn't know that my PayPal account is based in Singapore therebefore I can't understand why in the portals of both agencies of the United States I can enter all the residency data corresponding to other countries.
They just record what you enter. They're not checking it for correctness at that time.

Here are the PayPal terms and conditions: https://www.paypal.com/ve/webapps/mpp/ua/useragreement-full