Marriot Room Accessed-Robbed

  • Hi Guest, welcome to the help forum. You can get fast answers to your customer service questions here. We have a dedicated team of advocates who are ready to help. Just go to the section that matches your question and ask us!
  • If you've posted a question or issue for our advocates to assist with, please be sure to check back frequently for responses and requests for clarification.
  • Did you know you can get email notifications when something new posts to your favorite forum? It's easy. Just click the "watch" link right next to the "post new thread" button at the top of your favorite forum. The rest is easy. Now you'll never miss another conversation.
  • Want to become an expert user? Drop by the How to use this forum section and all will be revealed. We'll show you how to make the most of your experience.
Apr 30, 2016
11
4
3
42
Jason, on top of our pages we have Customer Contacts. I suggest writing a letter to the email address for Customer Service. Give them a week to reply - if they don't or don't give you a satisfactory answer, email the first executive shown. Give him a week to reply and if necessary, write to the next executive. Continue weekly until you get to the top.

Hopefully one of the executives will get involved in this.
Great info, thanks a lot Neil!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Neil Maley
Apr 30, 2016
11
4
3
42
This is sickening. I have been whining about "checking into your room with your phone" lately and I have always been vaguely concerned about the electronic lock on my room. It's only common sense that if a computer codes a keycard, the whole system is easily foiled. I guess my concerns are quite valid. Unlike our OP, I only have a laptop that's password-protected, but I doubt if they'd stop long enough to verify that, they'd just grab it. So now what? Back to Euro-style big heavy keys with tassels?
Great point, as convenient as the key cards are, I'd have no issues using a key. That's one good thing about some places in other parts of the world that use keys. One might say they're behind times, perhaps they're just smarter. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: jsn55
Apr 30, 2016
11
4
3
42
Such good points. If a key was used, the hotel has the history. I kind of put this in the category of the investigation, which I wouldn't feel the need to be privy to, so long as I was compensated. This really is the job of a Detective, who obv won't have any affiliation with the hotel. You should be in contact with a Detective. I'm assuming your stuff wasn't in the safe.
Yes I am going to get an investigator involved for sure, if the thing else to try and find the loser that did this. He has left quiet a trail with all the shopping that was done on my cards. Someone has to have better camera footage than the useless footage at the courtyard.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AAGK

Carol Phillips

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 28, 2014
1,258
1,735
113
Coastal South Carolina
Yes I am going to get an investigator involved for sure, if the thing else to try and find the loser that did this. He has left quiet a trail with all the shopping that was done on my cards. Someone has to have better camera footage than the useless footage at the courtyard.

And y'know, @Jason E Jacobs , that's something I'd be talking to Marriott about. No cameras in the hallways? Really unacceptable in this day ...
 

JVillegirl541

Verified Member
Nov 21, 2014
3,925
4,034
113
Wow, great find indeed. Thanks!! I'll use this as well for my case. Clearly a vulnerable system that is still not safe.
@Jason E Jacobs please note this article is from 2013 and may not apply. How did they gain access and did the hotel security tell you about who opened that door? Assuming that is how they gained access?
 
Sep 19, 2015
5,589
8,381
113
50
Jason please note that the article is from 2013; what struck me is how quickly your room was robbed and how almost everything was taken -- just like the 2013 and 2012 robberies. This is not to say that it is not an inside job but we all have to be aware that there are security flaws in the key card system that can be exploited. Has the hotel given you any information or are they keeping their mouths closed? Someone was arrested for the 2012 robberies in Houston. From what you wrote it sounds like there was no indication of a person entering through a window or terrace, only the front door,
 
  • Like
Reactions: AAGK and jsn55

JVillegirl541

Verified Member
Nov 21, 2014
3,925
4,034
113
Did they pulls printout of the keys used in your room? They should have a report that shows every key used to access the room.
We have been asking questions with every post but sadly our client has not offered any additional info inspite of our questions. :(
 
Last edited:

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,426
23,398
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
Honestly, it doesn't matter at this point, the police should and could have asked for it.

At this point Executives need to know about it and the lack of co-operation at the hotel. This isn't just any Tom Dick or Harry, there was possibly a pilots license involved. It's a huge security risk.
 

johnbaker

Verified Member
Oct 2, 2014
1,097
1,809
113
47
@Jason E Jacobs For a point of reference, here's a PDF I found online with all the Inn Keepers laws in the US (http://www.inn-security.com/resources/innkeeper_statutes_manual.pdf )

Short version is that they are only liable for $50 unless you can prove negligence on the part of the hotel or they failed to have a safe available to you that would hold the stolen valuables (like in the office). Since they aren't going to voluntarily share that information and its unlikely they're going to reimburse you at this point, you're going to need to decide if its worth your while to go hire a lawyer to pursue this.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JVillegirl541
Apr 30, 2016
11
4
3
42
Thanks John, I would have needed a safe the size of a king bed to store what they took so I don't see that as viable. I think I will hire attorney just for the principle of it. Let a hungry attorney have fun with it as I am sure there is negligence to be found. Between that and spreading the word around the world of the lack of responsibility and unsafe practices I'll feel better.

Thanks again.

Jason
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
23,426
23,398
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
Thanks John, I would have needed a safe the size of a king bed to store what they took so I don't see that as viable. I think I will hire attorney just for the principle of it. Let a hungry attorney have fun with it as I am sure there is negligence to be found. Between that and spreading the word around the world of the lack of responsibility and unsafe practices I'll feel better.

Thanks again.

Jason
The only issue is that if there was a safe in the room and you didn't put any of this in the safe, they are going to claim you didn't safeguard your stuff. We had that happen with a claim about a year ago here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AAGK
Apr 30, 2016
11
4
3
42
The only issue is that if there was a safe in the room and you didn't put any of this in the safe, they are going to claim you didn't safeguard your stuff. We had that happen with a claim about a year ago here.
And if the door is so easily accessed, so is the safe. I have never trusted the safes. Someone has a fail safe entry into that safe so in event you forget password. its digital so I don't trust it at all. I don't trust the doors either but have no choice and as I learned that was a mistake too.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
9,906
10,713
113
San Francisco
And if the door is so easily accessed, so is the safe. I have never trusted the safes. Someone has a fail safe entry into that safe so in event you forget password. its digital so I don't trust it at all. I don't trust the doors either but have no choice and as I learned that was a mistake too.
You are so right, Jason. I do hope you hire an attorney, this "it's not my fault" by hotels when it is obvious that they ARE at fault refrain is ridiculous. Someone entered your room in their hotel, with a hotel key, so how does that make them not responsible?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Neil Maley

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
9,906
10,713
113
San Francisco
Judy it's not his lack of posting its the lack of clarifying any questions asked.
I was discussing this case with a TSA guy at O'Hare today ... he agrees with us, this is a serious security issue. I think Jason has a huge list of things to take care of and might not come back to us right away.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Neil Maley
Aug 31, 2015
1,325
2,445
113
Don't turn around . . . .
Did they pulls printout of the keys used in your room? They should have a report that shows every key used to access the room.
And every key access will present with an expiration date on the key used in most of these systems . . .

We had a case years ago that used a key to access a room to commit theft - and the printout showed that the key was created a month before the theft, and was due to expire a month from the date of the theft. The front desk person just programmed the key for the max time so they did not have to enter the full information on checkout.

A nefarious person [most likely a housekeeper or other hotel employee] knew about this practice and simply grabbed a key and held on to it until someone with visible valuables checked into that room . . . ..

The hotel company settled pretty quick after that little bit of discovery. The hotel fought disclosure of the key records tooth and nail - which was little unusual which told me we needed to fight to get it. The few days prior to disclosure they kept trying to settle for first 20 cents on the dollar - then 40, 50 finally 65 cents the day before. The week after we got 100 cents plus the cost of filing and fighting them for the info. . . .