Keep the vouchers or file a claim?

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Patina

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Dec 22, 2015
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Is there a reason you need to request a refund from the insurance company at this time?
 
May 16, 2018
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Sorry, I should have made it clear in the first post: we have a cancel-for-any-reason policy.
When I last tried to call IMG, there was a very long hold, so I tried "chat". The advice was to send in a claim. I'm trying to avoid using the claim route, because the policy would only reimburse for 75% of the cost of the air fare.

Here's the alternatives: Air Fare: $2,500. Delta voucher: $2,500. Insurance premium: $350 Insurance payment for air fare: $2,100.

Plan A: Accept Delta vouchers, don't submit insurance claim: Value: $2,500-cost of wasted insurance premium $350=net to me $2,150; cost to ins. co: $0.
Plan B: Same as A, except get refund of ins. premium: net to me $2,500; cost to ins. co.: $350.
Plan C: Reject Delta vouchers, submit ins. claim: air fare $2,500-ins payment $1,875-cost of ins. premium $350= net to me $1,525; cost to ins. co.: $1,875.

Even though this all looks convoluted, it looks like the most equitable solution is Plan B, as long as I keep the vouchers to use. I get the best value, and it costs the insurer only $350. If I file a claim, Plan C, I get the least value, and it costs the insurer the most. If I simply accept the vouchers and don't submit a claim, Plan A, the insurer gets the most value, pays nothing, and I end up paying for insurance, but not using it.

I know it seems nuts. We don't ask for return of premium on our home or car insurance if we don't submit claims. But these are strange times.

Thanks for helping to sort this out.
May I ask why you care what it costs the insurance company? Paying claims isn't just part of the cost of doing business for them. It is the business itself. Is there a reason you are trying to save the insurance company money? Just curious...
 
Apr 8, 2020
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Sorry to have made this so complicated.

Patina, I'm not sure what you are getting at in your question. I guess I don't "need" to request a refund at this time, but I think there must be some deadline for such a process, though it has not been stated.

Jane4321, I'm not looking to save the insurer money. I have just done the arithmetic, and find it would be less costly for them to refund my premium, than for me to file a claim for air fare costs. The only reason the option of premium refund even came into my head was that I read about it happening on some other forum, and it seemed like a fair solution. After all, once the cruise was cancelled, and I cancelled the flights, the insurer had no risk whatsoever. They earn their income by accepting risk, and managing it. I imagine they all have reinsurance in this current disaster, so some downstream reinsurer is probably on the hook for some large losses.

I just went to Delta's site, to see if they show any eCredits on my account: nope, nothing in the Wallet, no voucher number, no $ value. "Call an agent when you are ready to book". If it were my choice, I would rescind the eCredit, if there really is one, file a claim, and take the insurance at 75% of the total. Be through with Delta. It's my wife who wants to keep the eCredits; she's the true believer.

Thanks for your continued interest, questions and comments.
 

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
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The reason I asked that is maybe there is no need to make a decision at this time. Just wait to see what happens then decide how to proceed.
 
May 16, 2018
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I just went to Delta's site, to see if they show any eCredits on my account: nope, nothing in the Wallet, no voucher number, no $ value. "Call an agent when you are ready to book". If it were my choice, I would rescind the eCredit, if there really is one, file a claim, and take the insurance at 75% of the total. Be through with Delta. It's my wife who wants to keep the eCredits; she's the true believer.

Thanks for your continued interest, questions and comments.
Seems to me there is no eCredit to rescind, and you should file your insurance claim.

If there are no eCredits in the account, nothing in the Wallet, no voucher number, and no dollar value, then you have nothing at all. Period. Full stop.

I had the same with Aer Lingus. They said they would eventually refund but deleted the tickets and any trace. No record locater. Nothing. I have filed a claim with the insurance and am waiting for them to process it. If by some miracle Aer Lingus returns my money, I can pay back the insurance company.

In your case, if later on Delta gives you something in writing showing your eCredits, you can either accept them and pay back the insurance, or refuse the eCredits and keep your insurance money.
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
Seems to me there is no eCredit to rescind, and you should file your insurance claim.

If there are no eCredits in the account, nothing in the Wallet, no voucher number, and no dollar value, then you have nothing at all. Period. Full stop.

I had the same with Aer Lingus. They said they would eventually refund but deleted the tickets and any trace. No record locater. Nothing. I have filed a claim with the insurance and am waiting for them to process it. If by some miracle Aer Lingus returns my money, I can pay back the insurance company.

In your case, if later on Delta gives you something in writing showing your eCredits, you can either accept them and pay back the insurance, or refuse the eCredits and keep your insurance money.
Not necessarily. They can see the credit at the airline when you give them your PNR number, which is why they are telling you that you need to call to rebook.
 
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Not necessarily. They can see the credit at the airline when you give them your PNR number, which is why they are telling you that you need to call to rebook.
But if the airline refuses to provide that and put it in writing, then it really doesn't exist.

Think of it this way. If you were claiming that you had a voucher or credit with the airline and you didn't have the email or piece of paper proving it, you can be sure they would not honor it.

The airline can't delete a reservation/tickets from your account and then just expect you to take their word for it that your credit still exists on their computers---but you aren't allowed to see it. Only they are, and who knows if months down the road, that goes poof as well, and there you are with no proof it existed.

I think trusting the airline or any company to honor something they won't put in writing and have deleted from your account is very risky. If you file your insurance claim and then the airline makes good, you can return the money to the insurance. But if you wait around waiting for the airline to give you something they won't admit in writing that you have, then you could lose your window to make the insurance claim.
 
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Patina

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Dec 22, 2015
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I believe all airlines are deleting reservations that have been cancelled. That happened to me with an Alaska Air flight that they cancelled as well as a flight to Spain that was not cancelled but significantly modified. I wouldn't be concerned about the reservation disappearing from your profile as long as you have the original receipt. But, I do share your concern that the airline is not emailing you a confirmation of some sort of credit, that is not acceptable.
 
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Sep 4, 2019
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But if the airline refuses to provide that and put it in writing, then it really doesn't exist.

Think of it this way. If you were claiming that you had a voucher or credit with the airline and you didn't have the email or piece of paper proving it, you can be sure they would not honor it.
Delta sent me this email upon cancellation (cancelled mid-March for a flight a few days later). It looks like it should be a pretty simple process to use that credit for a future flight and it may be possible to check the value with a mock booking but I haven’t tried.

___________________________

We've successfully canceled your trip. Please retain the ticket/document number(s) below.

The remaining value of the ticket(s) may be applied to a future booking within one year of the original ticket purchase, subject to the rules and ticket policy. Tickets meeting waiver criteria‌,including all flights departing in March or April 2020 and all bookings made in March 2020, will not incur any change fees. If you have remaining value that you would like to redeem, just enter the ticket or document number as an eCredit before booking your next flight with us.

Delta continues to reassess its cancellation policies in light of the coronavirus situation, so please retain this document and check back later once service volumes have subsided.

Please note that not all tickets will have value remaining after change fees are applied, and some tickets (such as Basic Economy tickets) may not be cancelable unless a specific waiver or exception applies.

(Name/Ticket number/Credit expiration date follow in the email)
 

weihlac

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Jun 30, 2017
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I believe all airlines are deleting reservations that have been cancelled. That happened to me with an Alaska Air flight that they cancelled as well as a flight to Spain that was not cancelled but significantly modified. I wouldn't be concerned about the reservation disappearing from your profile as long as you have the original receipt. But, I do share your concern that the airline is not emailing you a confirmation of some sort of credit, that is not acceptable.
On United all you need to do is go to all trips and you are presented with :
Clicking on"Cancel" displays a listing of all the trips I recently canceled in April and June


I suspect that the other airlines have similar pages once you sign in to your profile.
 
May 16, 2018
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I believe all airlines are deleting reservations that have been cancelled. That happened to me with an Alaska Air flight that they cancelled as well as a flight to Spain that was not cancelled but significantly modified. I wouldn't be concerned about the reservation disappearing from your profile as long as you have the original receipt. But, I do share your concern that the airline is not emailing you a confirmation of some sort of credit, that is not acceptable.
It's a problem even with the original receipt because:
1. you don't have the proof that they were the ones to cancel
2. you don't have proof of the amount they agreed to for the voucher or refund.
3. if you wait for confirmation you lose your chance to apply for insurance claim
 
May 16, 2018
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Delta sent me this email upon cancellation (cancelled mid-March for a flight a few days later). It looks like it should be a pretty simple process to use that credit for a future flight and it may be possible to check the value with a mock booking but I haven’t tried.

___________________________

We've successfully canceled your trip. Please retain the ticket/document number(s) below.

The remaining value of the ticket(s) may be applied to a future booking within one year of the original ticket purchase, subject to the rules and ticket policy. Tickets meeting waiver criteria‌,including all flights departing in March or April 2020 and all bookings made in March 2020, will not incur any change fees. If you have remaining value that you would like to redeem, just enter the ticket or document number as an eCredit before booking your next flight with us.

Delta continues to reassess its cancellation policies in light of the coronavirus situation, so please retain this document and check back later once service volumes have subsided.

Please note that not all tickets will have value remaining after change fees are applied, and some tickets (such as Basic Economy tickets) may not be cancelable unless a specific waiver or exception applies.

(Name/Ticket number/Credit expiration date follow in the email)
You have it in writing! Those of us who had tickets disappear from Aer Lingus and other airlines do not have anything in writing, and Aer Lingus actually told me they will not ever provide anything.
 
May 16, 2018
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Don't you have the original email with your confirmation number? You can file a complaint with the DOT.
Yes, yes! Of course I have the original email, and I could file a complaint with DOT. That would languish for months and I still have no proof that the airline and not I canceled the flights. Why would I want to spend time and effort writing to DOT if I already have insurance like the OP does and can simply file a claim and get my money back?

I don't know about other people, but I don't enjoy chasing after my money, waiting months for the airline to respond, filling out forms for DOT, and so forth. That's why I bought insurance.
 
Sep 4, 2019
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You have it in writing! Those of us who had tickets disappear from Aer Lingus and other airlines do not have anything in writing, and Aer Lingus actually told me they will not ever provide anything.
OP has a Delta ticket. If they haven’t received the email I copy-pasted, they should try checking the spam/junk folder for verification.
 
Apr 28, 2020
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@goofiness Would you be willing to share the name of the insurer that you used? I typically use Travel Insured International. I think it is smart for the insurance companies to offer a premium refund instead of paying out the 75% frankly. Seems like good business.
 
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@goofiness Would you be willing to share the name of the insurer that you used? I typically use Travel Insured International. I think it is smart for the insurance companies to offer a premium refund instead of paying out the 75% frankly. Seems like good business.
I am not following you at all. Why on earth would I want a refund on my premium instead of recovering the cost of the air ticket that I sought to protect by buying insurance in the first place?

I don't think it would be legal for the insurance company to break my contract and give me a refund on the premium rather than paying the claim.

I have never heard of an insurance company trying to get out of a claim by refunding the premium. If they don't want to pay, they try to find a legitimate way to deny the claim. If you have cancel-for-any-reason insurance, then the only reason for them to deny is if you or the airline canceled less than 48 hours before the trip was to begin.
 

Dwayne Coward

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Yes, yes! Of course I have the original email, and I could file a complaint with DOT. That would languish for months and I still have no proof that the airline and not I canceled the flights. Why would I want to spend time and effort writing to DOT if I already have insurance like the OP does and can simply file a claim and get my money back?

I don't know about other people, but I don't enjoy chasing after my money, waiting months for the airline to respond, filling out forms for DOT, and so forth. That's why I bought insurance.
I would recommend doing both in case the insurance company denies the claim, then your complaint is already in works. Plus if the airline is not providing a refund as required by regulations, your complaint is on file and with enough complaints, they may take enforcement action against them. Travel insurance only covers the events listed in the policy, and usually, the airline not providing a refund is not something they cover except maybe if they go out of business/bankrupt (except for CFAR, but then payment may not be the full amount or only a credit depending on the policy). Based on the complaints we are seeing it appears that travel insurance claims are taking up to 60 to 90 days to complete. We have seen several DOT complaints come back faster in the last month or so.
 
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May 16, 2018
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@goofiness Would you be willing to share the name of the insurer that you used? I typically use Travel Insured International. I think it is smart for the insurance companies to offer a premium refund instead of paying out the 75% frankly. Seems like good business.
I use Squaremouth for every trip. This particular trip with Aer Lingus was insured with Travelex. I have recently filed the claim.