Hotel in Turkey I booked gave me somewhat of a backhand threat?

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Sep 19, 2015
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One of the reviewers on Google said he was made to stay in a room with cracks and the walls of which was held by some metal contraption. I wouldn't be surprised if this ends up being an undercover brothel
Your imagination is running wild on the basis of one person’s comment on an Internet forum. You have no basis to conclude that and only one of how many reviews have even inferred such a thing?

Razilon is correct — the way the credit card company is reported to have responded it does not sound as if they said rebook just for the charge to be rerun.

I have had charges initially blocked when doing card not present transactions with overseas merchants. Once I verify the transaction I check with the merchant to see what they are doing.

And perhaps making travel plans at 2 am is not the best strategy.

And you are dealing with someone in Turkey who is likely not a native English speaker either so the “gun” comment could just be faulty English or translation. You may have been polite but to another non native English speaker there may have been a lot lost in translation and they did not think the request was polite or honourable.

And prostitution is legal in Turkey since the days of Ataturk and there are licensed brothels — just as there are in parts of Nevada. What one thinks of that morally is another issue but it is not a crime in Turkey.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Your imagination is running wild on the basis of one person’s comment on an Internet forum. You have no basis to conclude that and only one of how many reviews have even inferred such a thing?

Razilon is correct — the way the credit card company is reported to have responded it does not sound as if they said rebook just for the charge to be rerun.

I have had charges initially blocked when doing card not present transactions with overseas merchants. Once I verify the transaction I check with the merchant to see what they are doing.

And perhaps making travel plans at 2 am is not the best strategy.

And you are dealing with someone in Turkey who is likely not a native English speaker either so the “gun” comment could just be faulty English or translation. You may have been polite but to another non native English speaker there may have been a lot lost in translation and they did not think the request was polite or honourable.

And prostitution is legal in Turkey since the days of Ataturk and there are licensed brothels — just as there are in parts of Nevada. What one thinks of that morally is another issue but it is not a crime in Turkey.
Worst is worst, I will just end up the price I should have paid for a better hotel and would stay in a terrible one. Chase didn't know what the charge was for, they just sent a general email saying the charge was blocked and that I would need to try paying again if I want to proceed with the sale. In any case, it will be a learning experience as from previous experiences I had the notion that once a charge is denied, you need a new transaction ID and code to proceed with the sale and you can not just randomly charge a persons card without him asking you to do so.
 
Feb 3, 2019
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The fact they might force me to pay or else won't let me check in is what makes me feel unsafe, not other things.
Refusing to allow you to check in until you've paid for all the rooms you booked would be entirely within their rights, as you do in fact owe the hotel for all three nonrefundable reservations you made voluntarily.

Now, when I tried to politely explained the hotel what had happened and asked them to cancel, these were their exact words, "Booking doesn't give us your credit card information to put it on the shelf, they give us so we have the right to charge you, we are not holding a gun at you to get your money. So you need to pay for the March 19-22 booking on top of everything you paid once you arrive for check in".....Now tell me, would you feel comfortable staying at a hotel, possibly alone, who uses this kind of language?
I don't find this language threatening at all. It sounds to me like they're using a very common figure of speech simply to emphasize that they didn't force you to make all those reservations - you did so voluntarily. This in no way indicates to me that they would actually force you at gunpoint to pay up.

Unfortunately, you made an error when booking and ended up agreeing to pay for rooms you don't actually want. While some businesses might be flexible on a non-refundable rate, this hotel has made it clear they intend to stick by the terms of the agreement you made with them during your bookings. I see nothing to indicate you are likely to persuade them at this point to change their minds and let you cancel without penalty.

Your choices here seem simple: pay the full bill that you owe, stay there, chalk the extra expense up to the cost of a lesson learned, and try to make the best of your visit; or refuse to pay at all, find new lodgings, and deal later with the consequences of the outstanding debt you've incurred. (There is of course always the option of paying the full bill but staying elsewhere, if you truly don't think you can stay there now.)
 
Sep 19, 2015
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As I mentioned I have lost money on non refundable rates — and learned a lesson from it — this was for Florence. I have also had to pay airline change fees, lost money on concert tickets when I could not go.... (no did not try to scalp the tickets).

I avoid hotels now that are non refundable only.

Many budget hotels are more rigid — but these are small businesses that have a low profit margin — the hotel owner pays a commission to Priceline — they take 20 to 30 percent of the charge. And then credit card takes 2 to 3 percent. And the credit card company may even charge the hotel to process the refund — meaning losing money on the transaction.

So of that $19 per day how much does the hotel actually get?

I mostly stay in smaller hotels in Europe — they are more rigid but more individual— it is a trade off, just as booking a non refundable rate.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Refusing to allow you to check in until you've paid for all the rooms you booked would be entirely within their rights, as you do in fact owe the hotel for all three nonrefundable reservations you made voluntarily.


I don't find this language threatening at all. It sounds to me like they're using a very common figure of speech simply to emphasize that they didn't force you to make all those reservations - you did so voluntarily. This in no way indicates to me that they would actually force you at gunpoint to pay up.

Unfortunately, you made an error when booking and ended up agreeing to pay for rooms you don't actually want. While some businesses might be flexible on a non-refundable rate, this hotel has made it clear they intend to stick by the terms of the agreement you made with them during your bookings. I see nothing to indicate you are likely to persuade them at this point to change their minds and let you cancel without penalty.

Your choices here seem simple: pay the full bill that you owe, stay there, chalk the extra expense up to the cost of a lesson learned, and try to make the best of your visit; or refuse to pay at all, find new lodgings, and deal later with the consequences of the outstanding debt you've incurred. (There is of course always the option of paying the full bill but staying elsewhere, if you truly don't think you can stay there now.)
I would like to see how you would feel if you were on the receiving end of it. Easy to say all this for other people, but I am sure you would consider the matter differently if you were involved in any way. They have no legal right to deny the reservations I have paid in full for, I would be 100% eligible for a credit chargeback if I do not receive the services I paid for. You should maybe look up the "fair credit billing act" under which quite a bit can be done by the credit card company for the customer, and which is also what my last option would be, although I would like to get it settled without such actions.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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As I mentioned I have lost money on non refundable rates — and learned a lesson from it — this was for Florence. I have also had to pay airline change fees, lost money on concert tickets when I could not go.... (no did not try to scalp the tickets).

I avoid hotels now that are non refundable only.

Many budget hotels are more rigid — but these are small businesses that have a low profit margin — the hotel owner pays a commission to Priceline — they take 20 to 30 percent of the charge. And then credit card takes 2 to 3 percent. And the credit card company may even charge the hotel to process the refund — meaning losing money on the transaction.

So of that $19 per day how much does the hotel actually get?

I mostly stay in smaller hotels in Europe — they are more rigid but more individual— it is a trade off, just as booking a non refundable rate.
Good advice. I didn't want to spend too much for the hotel because I was going to be out most of the time and only needed a place to crash in at night. This is my first ever time in the 6 years I have used priceline to change a booking and a pretty terrible way to learn a hard lesson. Last time the hotel I stayed at in Turkey, took cash from me upon checking in, I booked through orbitz and I wish I stayed with them.
 
May 7, 2019
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I am going, regardless of my friend coming or not, so I thought even if my friend later joins me, I can always pay them more and get a bigger room or my friend can make a separate booking for himself. The pictures from the hotel looked like it was a very decent hotel and the location was really good (less than a mile from major tourist attractions). The hotel has a 7 star rating on Priceline.com and was cheap enough to bait me for into making an impulse booking. If it makes sense, I made three separate reservations in total. In the first round, I made the two separate reservations in case my friend comes(17-19 & 19-22), once it was denied I made one single reservation for 17-22 altogether.

The name of the hotel is Ottoman Time Hotel in Istanbul Turkey, 0.8 miles from Grand Bazar and about a Mile away from Sultanahmet which is where most tourist attractions are. I also agree with you 100% that it was my fault to make a second impulse booking once the card was denied at 2AM. I had little experience with changing/canceling reservation with priceline as this would be my first time ever doing such.
I might have made the same mistake. I won’t now, after reading this thread.

This hotel certainly ought to reverse your second, mistaken, booking. And your credit-card bank, Chase, ought to advocate for you in that regard. In all candor, in my many years traveling with American Express as my card of choice, I believe American Express would do that for me in this situation.
 
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Carrie Livingston

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Jan 6, 2015
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I would like to see how you would feel if you were on the receiving end of it. Easy to say all this for other people, but I am sure you would consider the matter differently if you were involved in any way. They have no legal right to deny the reservations I have paid in full for, I would be 100% eligible for a credit chargeback if I do not receive the services I paid for. You should maybe look up the "fair credit billing act" under which quite a bit can be done by the credit card company for the customer, and which is also what my last option would be, although I would like to get it settled without such actions.
I'm not sure the FCBA is going to help you in this case. You admit you made multiple reservations. You entered into a contract and I don't think you will win a credit card chargeback.
 
May 7, 2019
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I'm not sure the FCBA is going to help you in this case. You admit you made multiple reservations. You entered into a contract and I don't think you will win a credit card chargeback.
He made the second booking because he understood that the first one had been declined. Yes, he notified his card company that the charge was his. But he did not understand that the hotel would re-submit the charge. I think that, at the very least, Chase should help him recover from the hotel the charge for the first booking that he thought had been declined.

It may be that Chase can’t help him. But it seems to me Chase should try.
 
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Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
He made the second booking because he understood that the first one had been declined. Yes, he notified his card company that the charge was his. But he did not understand that the hotel would re-submit the charge. I think that, at the very least, Chase should help him recover from the hotel the charge for the first booking that he thought had been declined.

It may be that Chase can’t help him. But it seems to me Chase should try.
That’s not quite correct- OP misunderstood what Chase told him:

“The hotel ran my card at 2AM my local time which is when it was denied. I told Chase electronically that it was me so the card doesn't get declined again when I book and I was foolish enough to make another reservation right away because the email I had received from Chase said that if money wasn't taken out, I need run the card again (which I implied as "make another reservation").”

HE implied it meant to make another reservation and admits it. The hotel ran the card again.

In any case, the only information we can offer the OP is to use our Priceline contacts or go back to Chase and pleads he misunderstood what he was told.
 

JVillegirl541

Verified Member
Nov 21, 2014
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My advice is to consider this an Expensive lesson and walk away (no run) you should NOT stay in this place and you will lose your money too.
Do some research and find a “safe and clean” place to stay after throughly researching your options.
 
Feb 3, 2019
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I would like to see how you would feel if you were on the receiving end of it. Easy to say all this for other people, but I am sure you would consider the matter differently if you were involved in any way.
You're quite correct that I'm basing my opinion of the wording you feel is threatening based only on what you've posted here, without knowing what the rest of your exchange with them entailed. If you feel threatened, you may wish to reconsider staying at that property at all.
They have no legal right to deny the reservations I have paid in full for, I would be 100% eligible for a credit chargeback if I do not receive the services I paid for
I rescind my earlier statement about the hotel being within their rights to refuse to allow you to stay if you don't pay for all the reservations you made. I have no idea what rights a private business would have under Turkish law to refuse lodging to someone who had already paid for it. You may wish to have a backup plan in case they do determine they do not want you staying there after all.

Best of luck resolving this to your satisfaction. I wish you a safe and enjoyable trip.
 
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Jan 10, 2020
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I'm not sure the FCBA is going to help you in this case. You admit you made multiple reservations. You entered into a contract and I don't think you will win a credit card chargeback.
I said that if the hotel denies me the room I paid for, then I can always go to FCBA.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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That’s not quite correct- OP misunderstood what Chase told him:

“The hotel ran my card at 2AM my local time which is when it was denied. I told Chase electronically that it was me so the card doesn't get declined again when I book and I was foolish enough to make another reservation right away because the email I had received from Chase said that if money wasn't taken out, I need run the card again (which I implied as "make another reservation").”

HE implied it meant to make another reservation and admits it. The hotel ran the card again.

In any case, the only information we can offer the OP is to use our Priceline contacts or go back to Chase and pleads he misunderstood what he was told.
These were the exact words from the chase email "If a purchase was declined, you will not be charged unless YOU try again". Their email said "unless YOU TRY AGAIN" not the hotel try again. From previous experience with a $1400 airline ticket being banned and I myself having to book it again, they didn't charge my denied transaction automatically. How would one think it would be any different then?
 
Jan 10, 2020
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I would still encourage the OP to write to Priceline and!politely ask for assistance. It could not hurt.
Thats my second step. I spoke to PL they said they'll contact the hotel and ask them to cancel all three for a full refund.

But leave out words like extortion, threatened, etc and write to contacts and mention duplicate booking because of credit card.
No, I will definitely be more professional when writing to executives.