Dell Kicked Me To The Curb

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May 30, 2019
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Fair enough but I am using the options given to me and every other user, AKA Add attachments.
I'm not a moderator, just some guy who likes to help other people. I will not open any attachments because I don't know if they contain malware or a virus. So the option might be there, but that doesn't mean it is optimal to use.

And, please keep in mind that we are volunteers on this forum trying to help you.
 
Feb 24, 2018
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Hello, This is a registered Letter ( Rough ) to the owner of the company, and it looks awkward on here because it is copy and paste and that is how the forum makes it look., it is much more tidy in a word app, and the reason for my "Letter " is to tell the owner of the company my experience in context, and inform him of the actions and behaviors of people he is paying to do a job, that they are doing very poorly.
Hello Robert, I understand.

This being said, understand that if you are writing a letter with this purpose- to share your experience and perspective that his employees are doing a poor job and why- the result is not going to be a resolution of your technology problems. It is going to be just what you stated: you will have expressed your frustrations, which will be received, and filed (metaphorically speaking) alongside hundreds of other bits of feedback, some worse than yours, some glowing. You might feel better than you let your voice be heard, but you will be in the same place with your computer.

Might we suggest that if your goal- or another one of your goals- is to resolve your technology problem, you follow the advice offered here about crafting the appropriate correspondence with that goal in mind and in a way that will help you achieve it. If you want to pursue a complaint about your treatment, that would be another fish to fry in a different way and a different time, rather than combining them into one issue.
 
May 30, 2019
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I tried reading the letter twice, and I couldn't figure out what it is you want. You need to get to the point and make clear what it is you want. Examples of this would include "Honor the original warranty and fix the computer as originally promised", "Replace the broken computer", "Reimburse me for parts I purchased", or something simple and succinct.

The letter is too long. There are more than 500 words after "In closing Mr. Dell" -- that's longer than most customer service letters in their entirety. It would be useful to lose all of the embellishments (i.e. "I have even been on the phone with support for so long at times and put on hold that my fully charged phone went dead.") and focus your story on what is relevant to what you are trying to get out of sending the letter.

And I agree with others that going to the top without trying other executive contacts first is less likely to be helpful. Elliot's site has several pages that explain why this is a useful approach.

Hope this helps.
 
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Apr 2, 2020
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A registered letter costs, what, 5 bucks? I think you're overestimating the power of it. Not to mention the letter might not even still be in the envelope that indicated it was a registered letter by the time it gets to someone to read. First of all, the CEO won't be signing for it. It'll then go with all the other mail the CEO gets to be sorted by someone that's not the CEO to then be disseminated to where it's supposed to go. Likely to the same person who reads emails sent to the CEO. A person whose job is to read letters all day long and answer them - I would think they'd prefer brief, concise letter that are to the point.
Yeah so what 5$ isn't much, and the person it is registered to, AKA M. Dell, will have to sign for it so not sure how you think someone else would get it to take it out of the envelope???? As for a short Letter I wish I could but this isn't a cut and dry situation like everyone I spoke with thus far at dell wants it to be, It's one that has to be explained in context.I won't be writing the good letter any longer then it needs to be, but I won't be trying to explain the issues in 20 words or less either.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
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Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
Maybe true but a letter that comes snail mail and a registered letter that you actually have to sign for, is probably a good indication that this is something one may want to take the time to read. And remember this is a rough draft, so if it come to having to take this option it will be worded to give the reader some incentive to read even though it maybe be long.
Not necessarily. We find here that emails using our company contacts work well.
 

justlisa

Feb 12, 2019
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Yeah so what 5$ isn't much, and the person it is registered to, AKA M. Dell, will have to sign for it so not sure how you think someone else would get it to take it out of the envelope???? As for a short Letter I wish I could but this isn't a cut and dry situation like everyone I spoke with thus far at dell wants it to be, It's one that has to be explained in context.I won't be writing the good letter any longer then it needs to be, but I won't be trying to explain the issues in 20 words or less either.
Well it's more than $5 if you're doing the option that restricts who can sign - though I still don't think that will get it directly into his hands. The USPS allows authorized agents to sign, so I'm still quite certain it will not be the CEO signing for it. Large corporations undoubtedly have authorized agents to recieve stuff on behalf of executives.
 

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
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Hello, This is a registered Letter ( Rough ) to the owner of the company, and it looks awkward on here because it is copy and paste and that is how the forum makes it look., it is much more tidy in a word app, and the reason for my "Letter " is to tell the owner of the company my experience in context, and inform him of the actions and behaviors of people he is paying to do a job, that they are doing very poorly.
Without reading your letter (yep, too long for me too!), if your goal was to inform the CEO of the actions and behaviors of his employees, have you not achieved that by sending the letter? Is there more that you want from the company?
 
Sep 18, 2018
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Robert, is the goal of your letter to complain about your treatment, or to ask for assistance in getting your technology problems fixed? I suggest you pick only one and separate the two.

If the goal is to get assistance with your technology problems, consider this: You could take out your entire first paragraph, and your entire three final paragraphs, and not change the meaning or content (so far as it relates to this) of your letter at all.
Along these same lines, Alienware is owned by Dell, so the off-topic dig at its higher prices doesn't really make sense. But that's only one among many off-topic issues that are hindering the point of your letter.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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Business people are busy; they generally don't work 9 to 5 . Someone might read a letter (email or registered) if the first paragraph summarized the problem and requests a specific solution. If your communication is more than 3 paragraphs, it will get set aside.

You came to us for advice, we're pretty good at self-advocating. If you don't agree with our advice, that's fine, but there's little we can do to help you. Why not try to boil down your communication so there's a chance that someone will read it?
 
Sep 10, 2017
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When you write a letter make it straight to the point. Don't mention other computers you had and focus on the one with the problem. The letter was long winded and I lost interest reading it. When you call tech support make sure you have pertinent information. Date of sale, service tag and express service code. You can go the Dell site, log-in and diagnose your system automatically. You can go to the bios and see your service tag. Service tag doesn't mean your system in covered for repair as most computers are only covered for a year but you can renew to have it fixed.
 
Feb 21, 2018
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Please also remember the current situation across all industries - many workforces are dispersed because of COVID-19, and it is highly likely that there are fewer individuals working regularly at the address your letter is going to. Sure, someone may sign for it, but it is likely be scanned and tossed in a pile for later, if ever, when the staff of that office is able to be present as normal. Your letter may end up at the bottom of a pile, never to be read by anyone.

Emails are far more likely to be seen - they don't require a physical presence at the office to be delivered.
 
Apr 2, 2020
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Maybe true but a letter that comes snail mail and a registered letter that you actually have to sign for, is probably a good indication that this is something one may want to take the time to read. And remember this is a rough draft, so if it come to having to take this option it will be worded to give the reader some incentive to read even though it maybe be long.
Hello, Already been trying the Regular ways.... " IT"S NOT WORKING " If you look at the items that I attacked to my mails you will see what kind of help I am receiving.
 
Apr 2, 2020
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Hello Robert, I understand.

This being said, understand that if you are writing a letter with this purpose- to share your experience and perspective that his employees are doing a poor job and why- the result is not going to be a resolution of your technology problems. It is going to be just what you stated: you will have expressed your frustrations, which will be received, and filed (metaphorically speaking) alongside hundreds of other bits of feedback, some worse than yours, some glowing. You might feel better than you let your voice be heard, but you will be in the same place with your computer.

Might we suggest that if your goal- or another one of your goals- is to resolve your technology problem, you follow the advice offered here about crafting the appropriate correspondence with that goal in mind and in a way that will help you achieve it. If you want to pursue a complaint about your treatment, that would be another fish to fry in a different way and a different time, rather than combining them into one issue.
I appreciate what your saying but if you and others look at the attachments I included with my Post(s) you'll see the " Help " LOL I am getting......
 
May 30, 2019
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If you disagree with the advice on this forum, at least consider this: In 20 words or less, specifically describe what you would like to happen as a result of sending the letter. Mention that in the opening paragraph of the letter, and repeat it in the last sentence of the letter. When you receive a reply, share it here. Hope things work out.
 
Apr 2, 2020
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If you disagree with the advice on this forum, at least consider this: In 20 words or less, specifically describe what you would like to happen as a result of sending the letter. Mention that in the opening paragraph of the letter, and repeat it in the last sentence of the letter. When you receive a reply, share it here. Hope things work out.
That's what I did say when I was actually speaking with a person at dell that said they were helping me, ( In a NutShell ) Their reply, Yeah we took your money for a flawed PC, you had to go out and buy your own parts while in our warranty, Good luck getting that help. ERGO My reason for want ting to speak with Mr. Dell AKA The registered Letter.
 
Apr 2, 2020
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That's what I did say when I was actually speaking with a person at dell that said they were helping me, ( In a NutShell ) Their reply, Yeah we took your money for a flawed PC, you had to go out and buy your own parts while in our warranty, Good luck getting that help. ERGO My reason for want ting to speak with Mr. Dell AKA The registered Letter.
And as to me disagreeing with suggestions, Not what so ever, they are all suggestions done multiple times to NO Avail, and again the reason I feel I have to send the registered letter, At least Mr. Dell himself or his trusted aid will have to sign for it, so I am sure it would get read.
 
Apr 2, 2020
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Let us know how the letter works.
Hey Neil the weird thing about all this I was given the impression that if I posted on this forum It would be a better chance of someone from dell to see it as they frequent this forum????? if that is the case then I guess I haven't got a reply from any of them because then that would show the rest of the people on this forum that they are unprofessional. All I got from others so far as responses, in a nutshell, if it's not Short and Sweet you don't get any help. God Forbid you actually would have to read the grievance. I am so happy that my late parents taught me better values, and my Father better business values, I would never treat any of my customers in such a way as I have been with Dell Computers. When a Customer feels the only other avenue is to have to write a letter to the Boss, it seems to be the consensus of people that answered me here so far, it has to be short & Sweet and I have to kiss azz. This letter is to inform the OWNER of the company that the people he has in positions to take care of these things " Professionally " are not worth what they are being paid, because you are reading that customers letter right now.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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And as to me disagreeing with suggestions, Not what so ever, they are all suggestions done multiple times to NO Avail, and again the reason I feel I have to send the registered letter, At least Mr. Dell himself or his trusted aid will have to sign for it, so I am sure it would get read.
Most likely mail to Dell is aggregated at a postal facility where an employee goes daily, or more often. He or she picks up a truckload of mail, some of which consist of letters and packages requiring signatures, and the employee signs. Then the mail goes to a central sorting facility where Dell employees divide it up. In that mail will be any number of letters to Mr. Dell, and neither Mr. Dell nor a "trusted aid" will touch that mail until some lower level employee decides, based upon instructions, where to send it. Mail to Mr. Dell complaining about a defective product will go to someone in that product group to handle. Yours will not be the only letter that day to Mr. Dell complaining about his products or employees. So if your goal is to bring to Mr. Dell's attention what you think are egregious actions by his employees, as most of the folks here have noted, and I now join, my best guess is that you will fail. Perhaps writing to Mr. Dell and sending the letter registered, return receipt, will provide psychic satisfaction to you. Maybe your letter will be sent to some executive assistant who solves problems. Maybe they look up your service tag and decide they've done all they feel like doing.

If your goal is to get your computer fixed or replaced, the folks here have provided good advice that seems to work.

A couple of years ago I had a Dell computer with a design defect. (You appear to have a computer with a sample defect.) I also had paid for on site service. Dell's solution to my troubles was to replace the motherboard, twice, which would not cure the design defect which was documented in the Dell knowledge database. Dell's tech's were worthless because (a) they typically just look at the same info I have, and (b) they can't redesign the computer to solve the problem. So i sympathize with your frustration. (Dell ultimately redesigned that series and solved the problem. I'm as frustrated as you that I seem to forever be a Beta tester at my expense for the computer industry.)

But you need to decide what your goal is. Is it to vent, or is it to get the computer fixed?