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Nov 14, 2019
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I have applied for the job in quickr I have got a call and they said we have * rounds for interview and for first round you have to pay 2000 for registration and 7000for training which is refundable when I go to airport for face to face interview is this real job offer plz say me and they given me the ac no for payment Account holder name-indigo pvt. Ltd.* This is the one is this the correct plz say me
 
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weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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Maui Hawaii
I have applied for the job in quickr I have got a call and they said we have * rounds for interview and for first round you have to pay 2000 for registration and 7000for training which is refundable when I go to airport for face to face interview is this real job offer plz say me and they given me the ac no for payment Account holder name-indigo pvt. Ltd.* no.- 20048252647 fsc code- FINo0001001This is the one is this the correct plz say me
" When I go to airport for face to face interview" you will find the airport and no interview. This is a scam as others have said. RUN AWAY!
 
Sep 19, 2015
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IndiGo has a warning about this and says it is a SCAM.

Low-budget carrier IndiGo has cautioned the aspirants and applicants willing to land up in a job with the company, advising them to be careful of the fraudulent offers in airline’s name. Posting a warning on microblogging site Twitter, IndiGo cautioned people of paying money in exchange for jobs to fraudsters claiming to represent the airline. These people are misusing the name of the brand and employees in exchange for job opportunities, it added.
Such fraudsters are using the IndiGo brand name to extract personal information and confidential bank details of candidates. The airline or its agents don’t ask for credit or debit card number, CVV or net banking login ID or any other sensitive information from the aspirants, it added. The airline or its employees also don’t ask to transfer funds to a personal account, it also said.


https://www.financialexpress.com/industry/indigo-cautions-against-fake-job-offers-heres-why-airline-asking-job-aspirants-to-be-careful/1564555/
 
May 28, 2019
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We really need to step up the consumer education offered to people so they don’t fall prey to these sorts of scams. It amazes me how frequently these scenarios crop up in the message boards…
 
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Apr 27, 2018
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If people are falling for this it means that people are desperate for good jobs. It is a shame when we supposedly have a good economy and low unemployment that people are still not making it
 
Jan 17, 2019
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We really need to step up the consumer education offered to people so they don’t fall prey to these sorts of scams. It amazes me how frequently these scenarios crop up in the message boards…
Problem is that new scams pop so frequently that by the time their noticed and education about them can happen there are already many victims. This makes consumer somewhat problematic.
 
May 1, 2018
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Problem is that new scams pop so frequently that by the time their noticed and education about them can happen there are already many victims. This makes consumer somewhat problematic.
The educations should not be focused on memorizing individual scams. It's really about teaching people that if something sounds too good to be true then it might be a scam. That no stranger just sends large sums of money out of the blue, nor should you send large sums of money to a stranger who requests it.
 
May 28, 2019
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The educations should not be focused on memorizing individual scams. It's really about teaching people that if something sounds too good to be true then it might be a scam. That no stranger just sends large sums of money out of the blue, nor should you send large sums of money to a stranger who requests it.
Yes. It’s 100% about critical reasoning skills.

I teach college (mostly freshmen) and it’s sometimes astonishing how much they have to learn about the world. I don’t remember being so clueless when I was their age. I also frequently teach international students, and I find that they are more gullible/prone to being taken advantage of than the ones who are born in the U.S. I don’t quite know why that is.
 
Feb 3, 2019
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I also frequently teach international students, and I find that they are more gullible/prone to being taken advantage of than the ones who are born in the U.S. I don’t quite know why that is.
Are these students from countries where official corruption, extortion, and bribery are rampant? In my line of work, I've found that what U.S. people would consider red flags for obvious scams - paying a hefty fee up front to some unknown person to get a job, as in this case - may simply be the way things get done in some other countries/cultures/communities.

It's not necessarily that non-U.S. people are more gullible - it could be that their context is fundamentally different.
 
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Sep 19, 2015
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Yes. It’s 100% about critical reasoning skills.

I teach college (mostly freshmen) and it’s sometimes astonishing how much they have to learn about the world. I don’t remember being so clueless when I was their age. I also frequently teach international students, and I find that they are more gullible/prone to being taken advantage of than the ones who are born in the U.S. I don’t quite know why that is.
I would not say at all that non-US people are more gullible -- that is really an excessive generalization. Look at all the comments on the FTC blog

Here is one about work at home job scams

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2017/08/false-promises-work-home-scam

Placement scams

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2019/02/job-seekers-avoid-executive-placement-scams

Fake check scam which also involves fake jobs

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2018/09/anatomy-fake-check-scam?page=2

Or the IRS imposter scam -- that certainly happens people only in the US -- and losses are reported in the millions.

International students may be at a disadvantage as they do not know the system -- but how do you account for all of the complaints that the FTC dels with?

Not sure your age, but decades ago technology had not made it so easy to scam people from thousands of miles away -- robo-dial, scanners to make fake checks, the low cost of posting something on the internet such as a fake website are just a few examples -- It is easier and cheaper to post a fake job offer on the internet compared to the past when a company had to pay for a classified ad in the newspaper.
 
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May 15, 2016
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If people are falling for this it means that people are desperate for good jobs. It is a shame when we supposedly have a good economy and low unemployment that people are still not making it
Even if there was a truly great economy, there will always be some people that are just not capable, for many reasons, of holding one of those jobs. Those same people are the ones that are the target audience for that scam promotion. Not everything is fixable.
 
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Oct 18, 2018
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There is a saying (and a movie): "You can't cheat an honest man." Often (not always) there is some truth to this idea. People who want "something for nothing," or to pay for an "advantage," are vulnerable to scammers. If you realize that you can only get what you can qualify for, and cannot buy some "advantage," you are less likely to be scammed. Just as others have noted above, if it's too good to be true (meaning, you are getting more than you reasonably deserve), it isn't true. While we all are vulnerable to being cheated, if you want to cheat, you will be cheated. Paying to be interviewed just doesn't sound right, because it implies you are trying to buy an opportunity. (Although, when you think about it, it is similar to paying an "application fee" to a college. That suggests to me that it's partly a scam. Silly of course, since colleges are always ethical, aren't they?)
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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My colleagues have expressed the truth very well. Rather than arguing who is more gullible than whom, use an easier criteria. If the information you're reading is not written in clear, correct English, assume it's a scam. Real information is written by people who can use grammar, syntax and vocabulary correctly. The bad guys have bad English, an easy "tell".
 
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