British Airways Account Access

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Aug 2, 2017
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Hi,

I'm a librarian at a public library and had an elderly patron who no longer remembers or has access to her old email accounts that are attached to her member number. She did not have the proper login information to her member account and wants to change the mailing address on her account. After having spoken to two people at british airways previously and another person the first day she came in (who I helped call in order to try to mediate), she was still repeatedly told to log in to the account she couldn't log into since she didn't have her password nor access to the email to get her password reset. She was repeatedly told the same thing, could not change her information, and at this point she figures she has to forfeit her miles. While I understand I can't be given confidential data by the airline, the unwillingness to tell me the advice being told her also just put her in a loop of confusion and no result, and this customer service is not at all friendly or helpful to those who don't use computers or email. She came back yesterday still with no progress and wants help getting this all fixed. Not sure why they won't let her verify information over the phone in order for her to change contact information or access her miles. She has her actual member ID number, passport, etc. but they still wouldn't give her more info. I sent in a complaint and haven't heard anything. Any help or tips appreciated!
 
Aug 2, 2017
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Jan 5, 2015
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Since she's gotten the run around from customer service, in that case I would have her prepare a short, polite letter to British Airways using our company contacts.

http://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/british-airways/

We really suggest email for this, but she can send it snail mail, there are addresses in the contacts. I agree there needs to be an alternative method for consumers that don't use computers for whatever reason, and perhaps there is buried in the fine print somewhere.
 
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ADM

Apr 10, 2017
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There has to be a way for her to access her account without that email address. What happens to people whose accounts have been compromised in some way and they can no longer be used? Is the issue that she doesn't remember the exact email address used for registration?

If it has been long enough the miles may have expired anyway. According to BA's website their miles expire after 36 months of non-use and/or accrual.
 
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Feb 9, 2016
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I've spoken to banks on behalf of my grandmother (who turns 100 in November)

All I have to do is perform a 3 way call and have her on the line to give permission to them to give me information. She can even stay on the line to talk to the rep.

Easy
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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Bless you for trying to assist! I've gotten into a couple of these password/login/email mystery merrygorounds over the years, but have always managed to extract what I needed. Something will need to be done eventually to allow people access to accounts if they no longer have the information to get themselves back in online. As far as I know, nothing exists right now to help with this.

If she no longer uses email at all, she is probably done with this subject; electronic communication is required for a frequent flyer account.

BA should be able to give her the balance in her account and the expiration date on a conference call with you. But that's probably about as far as she'll get. As the demographics change, more and more people will be walking away from the internet. But first they should be writing down every single account, login ID, password, security question so this kind of thing doesn't come back to bite them 5 years later. You are a saint to continue to help her and I'll bet you'll be able to get that info for her eventually.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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San Francisco
I've spoken to banks on behalf of my grandmother (who turns 100 in November)

All I have to do is perform a 3 way call and have her on the line to give permission to them to give me information. She can even stay on the line to talk to the rep.

Easy
But of course, the banks make money on their customers. Frequent flyer accounts are a liability to an airline, and they have no interest in helping a member.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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Just a little slice of sick humor here ... my friend Anita's property was pretty well wiped out by Katrina. Her phone/internet service was with MCI. It was all down and she needed to get it working again. Nobody would ever answer the phone. When she'd contact MCI from someone else's computer, the only instructions were to submit the problem online from the affected location. This went on for weeks ... she finally used my method for dealing with this 'stupid stuff' ... walk into the establishment and bash your fist on the counter to get someone's attention. Lean forward, look them in the eye and very quietly say "I need some help with a simple problem. I need you to listen carefully to what I say. Can you do that?". That usually terrifies them and will get you a manager. She had full service restored in 3 days.
 
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May 17, 2016
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Just a little slice of sick humor here ... my friend Anita's property was pretty well wiped out by Katrina. Her phone/internet service was with MCI. It was all down and she needed to get it working again. Nobody would ever answer the phone. When she'd contact MCI from someone else's computer, the only instructions were to submit the problem online from the affected location. This went on for weeks ... she finally used my method for dealing with this 'stupid stuff' ... walk into the establishment and bash your fist on the counter to get someone's attention. Lean forward, look them in the eye and very quietly say "I need some help with a simple problem. I need you to listen carefully to what I say. Can you do that?". That usually terrifies them and will get you a manager. She had full service restored in 3 days.
What sick humor? The direct approach is always effective--especially if you look or sound slightly deranged.
 
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