Amtrak scheduling (Train has been late for six months straight)

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Jan 15, 2020
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I'm having trouble understanding how arriving seven minutes late represents a problem, and being stuck with this minor annoyance should be a positive. In my wildest dreams, I cannot imagine AmTrak able to do anything about this situation. I can't imagine anyone being able to do something. Mengmus, what are you looking for?
um, not a minor annoyance of delay. They should at least change the schedule of their trains. They should also be forthright on what causes delays.
 
Apr 30, 2016
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I reviewed the Amtrak schedules for #178 and #2404 (the Acela nonstop). It appears that #2402 has to pass #178, and this occurs at the location that the OP sees the train pass. There appears to be no other northbound trains in the area during this time. There are some southbound trains, so no trains can be switched to the southbound side for these northbound trains to pass each other. #2402 is a high speed train that has superiority over other trains, thus other trains have to "pull over." The train dispatcher controls all of this. After #2402 passes #178 the signals have to clear and there may be a built-in time delay in operating the switches to get #178 back on the high speed track. Train 2402 also passes #2122 up the line in New Jersey, so there may be issues there as well. Since #2402 is a new train inserted into the schedule, there is a learning curve to over come. Perhaps the fix to this is for Amtrak to adjust the schedule to delay #178's departure from Washington by about 12 minutes. (I am a retired train conductor and train dispatcher.)
 
Sep 9, 2018
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I reviewed the Amtrak schedules for #178 and #2404 (the Acela nonstop). It appears that #2402 has to pass #178, and this occurs at the location that the OP sees the train pass. There appears to be no other northbound trains in the area during this time. There are some southbound trains, so no trains can be switched to the southbound side for these northbound trains to pass each other. #2402 is a high speed train that has superiority over other trains, thus other trains have to "pull over." The train dispatcher controls all of this. After #2402 passes #178 the signals have to clear and there may be a built-in time delay in operating the switches to get #178 back on the high speed track. Train 2402 also passes #2122 up the line in New Jersey, so there may be issues there as well. Since #2402 is a new train inserted into the schedule, there is a learning curve to over come. Perhaps the fix to this is for Amtrak to adjust the schedule to delay #178's departure from Washington by about 12 minutes. (I am a retired train conductor and train dispatcher.)

PERFECT explanation!!!!!
 
Jan 15, 2020
14
6
3
38
I reviewed the Amtrak schedules for #178 and #2404 (the Acela nonstop). It appears that #2402 has to pass #178, and this occurs at the location that the OP sees the train pass. There appears to be no other northbound trains in the area during this time. There are some southbound trains, so no trains can be switched to the southbound side for these northbound trains to pass each other. #2402 is a high speed train that has superiority over other trains, thus other trains have to "pull over." The train dispatcher controls all of this. After #2402 passes #178 the signals have to clear and there may be a built-in time delay in operating the switches to get #178 back on the high speed track. Train 2402 also passes #2122 up the line in New Jersey, so there may be issues there as well. Since #2402 is a new train inserted into the schedule, there is a learning curve to over come. Perhaps the fix to this is for Amtrak to adjust the schedule to delay #178's departure from Washington by about 12 minutes. (I am a retired train conductor and train dispatcher.)
Pixie Pie:

thank you for your explanation! I had a feeling it was that train. They alluded to it, but have not come forward to provide a detailed explanation or even begin to review schedule changes. They said that they could possibly change the schedule. Overall, they‘ve been very cavalier about the situation which is my primary source of frustration.
 
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Dec 20, 2018
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Pixie Pie:

thank you for your explanation! I had a feeling it was that train. They alluded to it, but have not come forward to provide a detailed explanation or even begin to review schedule changes. They said that they could possibly change the schedule. Overall, they‘ve been very cavalier about the situation which is my primary source of frustration.
I read that the trip between Philly and D.C. takes 90 minutes-two hours. Is that true? If so, can I just say that I am envious??

I work in downtown Cleveland and live in a suburb roughly 18 miles away. My daily public transit commute takes me 90 minutes. It's a 25-35 minute drive, depending on traffic.

Yep, 90 minutes and two busses, plus a fair amount of walking, to commute 18 miles one way. And that's assuming everything goes perfectly, meaning neither bus is late (or doesn't show up at all), and there's no bad weather or traffic jams.

And forget about getting a seat on my second bus of the day, most days, because the bus is packed to capacity.

I wish I could take Amtrak between my job and my home! Our public transportation in this country is definitely lousy. Yes, I know Amtrak too, compared to trains in other countries.
 
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Jan 15, 2020
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I read that the trip between Philly and D.C. takes 90 minutes-two hours. Is that true? If so, can I just say that I am envious??

I work in downtown Cleveland and live in a suburb roughly 18 miles away. My daily public transit commute takes me 90 minutes. It's a 25-35 minute drive, depending on traffic.

Yep, 90 minutes and two busses, plus a fair amount of walking, to commute 18 miles one way. And that's assuming everything goes perfectly, meaning neither bus is late (or doesn't show up at all), and there's no bad weather or traffic jams.

And forget about getting a seat on my second bus of the day, most days, because the bus is packed to capacity.

I wish I could take Amtrak between my job and my home! Our public transportation in this country is definitely lousy. Yes, I know Amtrak too, compared to trains in other countries.
It is approximately two hours from Philadelphia to DC and vice versa n
 
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Nov 27, 2019
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agreed. I wasn’t trying to counter your post. I would hope that, if Amtrak becomes profitable, it will spur the government to invest more in refining travel (at least along the Northeast Corridor).
The Northeast Corridor makes money, along with a few other small parts of the system. It's the long haul business outside the NE that bleeds cash, but Amtrak management can't cut back without catching hell from politicians in the affected states.