Paris for 10 euros a night — uh, make that 100 euros

Question: I recently booked a hotel in Paris through Travelocity for 10 euros a night. Great rate, huh? Afterward, I booked airline tickets separately.

Not long after that, in the course of e-mail conversations with the hotel, they told me this was a mistake and that they could not honor the rate. Instead, they offered to increase my rate to 100 euros a night.

I then contacted Travelocity via phone, told them the problem and they called back and left me a voice mail saying it was a mistake and to go ahead and travel and then when I got back to contact the consumer relations department for a refund. I still have the voice mail. I contacted the hotel via e-mail and I said I would accept the new rate.

Now Travelocity has offered me a $50 voucher for my trouble. A few days later, they upped it to $250. This is pretty much worthless to me as I usually travel using miles and book my hotels using points. Can you help? — Patrick Kerr, St Louis

Answer: You’re right, that’s a great rate for a hotel room. Unbelievably good. And if Travelocity hadn’t left a voice mail promising to refund 90 euros a night, your case wouldn’t stand much of a chance.

Think of it like this: If you see a kitchen appliance on sale for 99 cents at the department store, instead of $99, would you demand the store honor the first price? No. Someone obviously put the wrong tag on the merchandise.

Contacting Travelocity was a good call. Saving the voice mail was even smarter. An email might have worked in this case, too. But the point is, you have a Travelocity representative on tape promising to make good — and it didn’t.

Do I really need to quote the Travelocity “Guarantee” that promises, “Everything about your booking will be right, or we’ll work with our partners to make it right, right away.” No, I don’t. You can read the whole warranty here if you’re interested.

Never mind guarantees. If a company promises you something — as in, a refund of your rate — it should deliver.

I have mixed feelings about your problem. On the one hand, Travelocity shouldn’t have offered to pay the difference between the real rate and something that was obviously a decimal point error. On the other hand, because it did, I think it should be held to its promise — not allowed to backtrack and offer you a voucher.

I would advise you to review each price carefully before booking. But a 10-euro a night hotel room in Paris at the time you were buying it, when hotel rates were at their lowest levels in decades, almost could have been correct.

This is all so confusing.

I contacted Travelocity on your behalf. It took another look at your case and found “obvious breakdowns in communication,” for which it apologized. You’ve received a full refund, as promised.

(Photo: steven wel/Flickr Creative Commons)

Christopher Elliott

Christopher Elliott is an author, journalist and consumer advocate. You can read more about him on his personal website or contact him at . Got a question or comment? You can post it on the new forum.

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