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How airlines plan to have their way with fare disclosure

The U.S. House of Representatives’ suspension calendar is an unlikely ground zero for a midsummer battle over airline ticket advertising. […]

When to bend a rule — and when to break it

Rules are meant to be broken, right? Well, you might be forgiven for thinking so if you're a regular reader of my work.
  • Here we go again! Another tarmac stranding incident — beware of outraged talking heads on TV
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    Here we go again! Another tarmac stranding incident — beware of outraged talking heads on TV

Here we go again! Another tarmac stranding incident — beware of outraged talking heads on TV

It seemed eerily familiar: A JetBlue aircraft, a freak storm, passengers stranded on an aircraft for hours -- and all happened near the media capital of the world.

Can this trip be saved? A flat tire on the way to the airport — and a $273 fee to fly

Ana de Pascht's airline ticket from Albany to Raleigh/Durham came with all of the usual restrictions: nonrefundable, nontransferable and non-changeable without paying a hefty fee.

“The Department of Transportation has used a bazooka to kill an ant”

The long-awaited sequel to this summer's controversial tarmac delay study has just been released. In it, aviation analysts Darryl Jenkins and Joshua Marks claim 384,000 more passengers were stranded by cancellations last summer, and an additional 49,600 air travelers experienced gate returns and delays. It calls on the Transportation Department to clarify its three-hour turnback rule -- a rule the DOT insists is a resounding success. I asked Jenkins about the study and its conclusions this morning. Here's our interview.

Tarmac-delay rule gives air travelers more respect

Tarmac-delay rule gives air travelers more respect

TSA’s liquid rules: So long, 3-1-1?

The Transportation Security Administration’s unpopular restrictions on liquids, gels and aerosols in carry-on luggage — better known as the 3-1-1 rule — are history.