BAGGAGE

IATA’s bogus motive to reduce size of carry-ons

The International Air Transport Association (IATA), an airline trade organization, is trying to reduce the size of air travelers’ carry-on bags. Why? It claims it wants to free space in aircraft overhead bins, so all passengers will be able to stow them and not be forced to gate-check them.
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4 reasons new carry-on bag sizes won’t fly

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has proposed a new “optimal” carry-on baggage size. Unfortunately, the new “optimal” size is only advantageous for the airlines, not their passengers. After creating the conditions that have led to overcrowding of inflight luggage bins, the airline solution is to make allowable carry-on bags smaller.

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Total fee absurdity: when your luggage costs more than your airfare

Nico/Shutterstock
Nico/Shutterstock

Tom Ungar and his wife spent $128 to fly from Venice, Italy, to Naples, which is a ridiculously low fare. But when their checked luggage tipped the scales at just over 20 kilos, their airline demanded an additional $152.

A luggage fee that exceeds your airfare? Welcome to the wacky world of a la carte fees — a world filled with consumer “benefits” that airline apologists believe you’ll love.

Ungar’s case is something of an extreme example. He was flying on easyJet, an airline known for its preposterous luggage policies. But ignore his cautionary tale at your own peril, because this is the world the Big Three legacy airlines aspire to, if we, their captive customers, would just let them.

Ungar’s misadventure began when he checked in for his flight in Venice recently. After placing their baggage on the scales, an easyJet employee informed the couple that their luggage was “a bit” overweight and pointed them to another representative. That person said their luggage was free to fly for an additional fee of $152.
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Ryanair orders passenger with bag question to “shut up” — does she deserve a refund?

The Irish discount carrier Ryanair has a well-earned reputation for unapologetically burying its customers in fees, including charges for carrying their bags on board. It isn’t as well-known for its unfailingly polite defenses of its indefensible policies and their uneven implementation.

Yomna Nasr’s story probably won’t change your opinion of Ryanair. But after reading it, you may grudgingly give it points for its clever non-apologies.
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