Frequently asked questions about vacation rentals

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about vacation rentals. You can find more FAQs here.

Before you rent

What’s a vacation rental?
When should I consider a vacation rental?
When should I not rent?
Should I wire money to a vacation rental owner?
Should I make a booking based on a rental listing?
Are vacation rental contracts just pro-forma agreements? Do I need to read them?
How do I find a vacation rental?
Should I send a friend to inspect my rental?
Can you explain the differences between professionally-managed and “by owner” vacation rental?
Is there an agency that certifies vacation rentals?
How professional is my professional rental?
Should I avoid renting a “by owner” property?

At the rental

What’s a vacation rental survival kit?
Will my rental come with sheets and towels?
Can I have a big party in my vacation rental?
What kind of vacation rental traps should I know about?
How does the vacation rental phishing scam work?
How do I protect myself from a scammy rental?
What are some contract red flags I should look for in a vacation rental?
This listing looks too good to be true. Is it?

After you rent

How do I resolve a dispute with a vacation rental owner or property manager?


BEFORE YOU RENT

What is a vacation rental?

Vacation rentals are freestanding, attached or guest houses, villas, cottages, apartments, condos and timeshares offered for short term occupancy. They are largely unregulated. Some rental properties are just one in a large portfolio handled and managed by a leasing company. Other vacation rentals are cared for, and rented out by, the owner.

When should I consider a vacation rental?

If you’re traveling with a large group, or a family, and need extra room. (Note: You can also find a smaller vacation rental for one or two people.)

✓ If you don’t like being bothered by housekeepers, room service, or being in close proximity with other guests, as you would be in a hotel. At many rentals, housekeeping may be available for a fee.

✓ If you desire the amenities found in a home, like a full kitchen, a pool, or a living room.

✓ If you value the cost-savings and convenience vacation rentals represent, such as preparing meals, storing snacks, in-home entertainment or splitting multiple bedrooms with your friends and family.

✓ If you enjoy getting together with family and friends in a home-like environment, with the benefit of your own space/privacy.

When should I not rent?

If you like having a consistent, predictable lodging experience, including daily housekeeping, towel and linen service, and room service, when you’re traveling.

✓ If you don’t need lots of space, but want to be somewhere centrally-located, such as a city center, or near a popular attraction.

✓ If you like to eat most of your meals in a restaurant, and don’t mind paying extra for things like laundry service.

Should I wire money to a vacation rental owner?

No. Never, never, ever wire money to a homeowner or rental manager. The rental may be legitimate, and the “owner” might sound like a perfectly nice person, but you are giving up many of your rights when you wire money. If the “owner” is a fake, you could lose everything. Always look for standard, secure phone or Internet reservations, with the ability to accept major credit cards.

Should I make a booking based on a rental listing?

No. The property description on an “official” rental site could be often filled with hyperbole. Don’t rely on just one source when you’re shopping around for vacation rentals. Consult independent reviews and pick up the phone and speak with the owner or manager before you sign any contract. Because nothing substitutes for a one on one personal phone conversation to gather information and details

Are vacation rental contracts just pro-forma agreements? Do I need to read them?

Read your contract. Again, a home rental isn’t a hotel, and certain terms and conditions may apply that you won’t find at any hotel. For example, the rental may insert a “non-disparagement” clause that prohibits you from posting a negative review. Fortunately, this is not a common practice. If you do, you could incur additional charges and also be required to remove the comments.

How do I find a vacation rental?

Most vacation rental apartments and homes are found online, but that’s not the only way.

✓ Online. Via a listing website like HomeAway, FlipKey or VRBO. Also, try Airbnb, which offers mostly “by owner” properties.

✓ Through a travel agency. Agents can offer vacation rental homes through their reservation systems, or a third party like the Travel Rental Network, which pays agents a commission.

✓ Through the classifieds section. Newspapers and magazines sometimes list short-term rentals, and there’s always the online classifieds, such as Craigslist. Warning: Craigslist listings tend to be scammy.

✓ In person. If you’re staying at a destination, and see a “for rent” sign, it’s worth asking if there’s some availability next year, if you’re planning to return. Reserving a property a year in advance offers many benefits such as the ability to negotiate a favorable rental rate, a good look at the property and neighborhood, and personal interaction with the owner or manager.

Should I send a friend to inspect my rental?

Yes, if you can. If you are staying in an area to visit friends, ask them to contact the owner or management company, and inspect the property before you rent. If the unit is unoccupied, there’s a good chance they’ll be able to do a quick inspection. This can even result in a lower price since the owner/management company will know the local can refer future customers.

Can you explain the differences between professionally-managed and “by owner” vacation rental?

A vacation home is a vacation home, right? Well, not necessarily. At some level, you’re getting essentially the same or a similar product, no matter who you’re renting from, but behind the scenes there are some noteworthy differences.

Professionally managed. A management company will almost always offer several payment options, including a credit card. Professional managers also use a more standard contract, so you’re less likely to find a surprise (but you should still read your contract thoroughly). You will usually find a 24-hour customer service contact, in case something happens while you’re renting. Some higher-end rentals also offer a concierge service for restaurant reservations and events. Above all, a professionally-managed rental will come with a baseline level of services, such as professionally cleaned properties, towels, linens, and a written guarantee that everything will be in working order when you check in. Note: In some areas, towels and linens are never included, no matter how you rent. In North Carolina’s Outer Banks, for example, linens are almost always extra. Keep an eye out for “junk” fees like a like a “reservation fee” or a “damage waiver fee” that might pop up without warning.

“By owner” rentals. Since the owner is responsible for maintenance, upkeep even if the property is handled by a management company, and any customer service aspects of your rental, the service and amenities might vary. Pay close attention to any online reviews, recommendations from friends, and references provided by the owner. Don’t expect any 24-hour hotline or concierge service, although owners are typically very responsive to their customers.

Is there an agency that certifies vacation rentals?

Not really. Some of the larger property management companies are affiliated with the Vacation Rental Managers Association the trade group for professional vacation rental managers. Not to be confused with VRBO, a popular site for “by owner” vacation rentals.

How professional is my professional rental?

Membership in the Vacation Rental Managers Association indicates that a management company is dedicated to elevating the vacation rental industry as a whole, and therefore your stay as well. Its members are more likely to hold themselves to a higher standard, including investing in staff education/training, follow best practices to stay abreast of industry trends and the example set by the VRMA’s Code of Ethics and Business Practices, all designed to improve your experience.

You can expect these companies to have a variety of properties to choose from, with reservation agents that can help you pick the property that will fit your needs. VRMA companies also provide 24/7 service, so if something happens during your stay, you have access to a real person on standby who can be there quickly to help.

Should I avoid renting a “by owner” property?

No. While you’ll get some peace of mind from a managed property, you can find many quality “by owner” properties on the market, too. In fact, if you’re a hands-on property owner, it may not make much sense to hand your property over to a real estate agency. Do the math. Once you factor in a 30 percent commission paid to the manager, a $100 per rental cleaning fee, and up to 2 percent to use a credit card, it’s more profitable to handle the rental yourself. What those numbers tell me is that by ruling out “by owner” properties, you’re ignoring a huge segment of the market — and possibly the perfect vacation rental.

AT THE RENTAL

What’s a vacation rental survival kit?

Did I already mention that a vacation rental isn’t a hotel? A time or two, maybe. Really, it isn’t. For some properties, you need a vacation rental survival kit.

✓ Toilet paper. Every vacation rental should have full rolls of toilet paper in every bathroom. Extras? Don’t count on it.

✓ Tin foil, plastic wrap, and garbage bags. If you’re planning to cook, you’ll need a few basic items. Some vacation rentals are stocked with these, but you can’t count on it. Ask before you check in.

✓ Oils and spices. Again, some homes may have these basic cooking ingredients, but they might not. (Unless the items are unopened, they may violate safety regulations and standards.)

✓ Laundry liquid and dish detergent. Some rentals come with more than you can use; others don’t even have a bar of soap. You can ask about the supplies, but the best plan is to swing by the rental, do an inventory, and head for the supermarket.

✓ Wi-Fi hotspot. Many vacation rentals claim to have “wireless” Internet, but it’s sometimes slow or nonexistent. If you positively need to stay in touch with the outside world, bring your own hotspot on your phone, or tether your cell phone to your laptop or tablet. Better yet, make sure they have cell phone reception in the area. Otherwise you could be out of touch.

Will my rental come with sheets and towels?

Not necessarily. Don’t assume; always ask if linens will be included in the rental. Many properties will add a surcharge for linens, and others don’t offer them at all. The last thing you want is to be stuck at a property at 11pm without any sheets for your bed.

Can I have a big party in my vacation rental?

Come on. Don’t rent a vacation rental to have a party unless this is disclosed and agreed upon in advance with the owner. Also, don’t sneak in pets where they are not allowed or paid for. Don’t ignore parking restrictions, don’t bring extra guests, don’t smoke inside if it is prohibited, and don’t disrupt the neighborhood. Renting a vacation rental is a two-way street where an owner is entrusting you and your group with what may be their largest asset, their house. Behave!

What kind of vacation rental traps should I know about?

Rental does not exist. Here’s a problem that affects some “by owner” rentals listed online or through a classified section. They always insist that you wire money, and when you arrive to check in, the home doesn’t exist. The best way to avoid it: don’t wire money, and look up the property online before signing a contract. If in doubt, check with the state and/or local municipality to confirm whether the manager or owner has a business license and is paying lodging taxes.

You put what in the contract? Since there’s no “standard” home rental contract, you can find all kinds of surprises in the fine print. The most unpleasant ones allow the homeowner or manager to pocket your deposit for virtually any reason. Others permit the owner to add cleaning fees and other frivolous surcharges to your final bill. These can be negotiated, but before you sign. So allow plenty of time to peruse the rental documents before you sign and pay a deposit.

Owner does not exist. In the last few years, phishing scams have proliferated that target the owners of vacation rentals. The only way to be certain that you’re dealing with a real owner is to call the number of a listing on a site like VRBO or FlipKey. Phone numbers are harder to fake. The only way to avoid being scammed is to never ever, ever wire money and to have a phone conversation with the owner.

I can’t do that in my rental? Since you’re renting a home and not a hotel room, you may face some unusual restrictions on how you use the property. To comply with local ordinances, the contract may specifically forbid you to have more than a certain number of guests join you in the rental. You may not be able to park your car in front of the building. You may not be able to invite more than a certain number of people over for a dinner party. Bear in mind, there are no standards when it comes to vacation rentals, so pay attention to every page of your contract.

How does the vacation rental phishing scam work?

Scammers sometimes steal vacation rental owners’ e-mail passwords to assume their identity, a crime called phishing. These crimes have affected rentals arranged online, mostly through large booking sites.

These criminals aren’t dummies. They use clever techniques to harvest the email password of a vacation rental owner, and then assume that person’s identity. They have real-looking contracts. They mimic their emails with uncanny accuracy. They’ll even negotiate with you, pretending to offer you a better rate. Remember, it’s it looks too good to be true, it probably is.

Never. Wire. Money. Don’t send money by wire to anyone — ever.

How do I protect myself from a scammy rental?

Some large websites that deal with vacation rentals offer insurance that will cover your rental. For example, VRBO will sell you what it calls a Carefree Rental Guarantee that covers losses related to phishing. You should also speak directly to the owner before you sign your paperwork. By calling the number on an official listing, you can be reasonably sure you’re dealing with the correct owner. Still — and this bears repeating — do not wire money.

What are some contract red flags I should look for in a vacation rental?

Just as a hotel may not initially offer a “grand” total for your stay, so also a vacation rental won’t always show all its cards. You should expect to pay cleaning fees, taxes and a damage waiver or deposits. In some cases, you may also find costs similar to other lodging options: small reservation fees, credit card convenience fees, resort amenity fees, or fees for pets, cancellations, and departure deviations.

Here are a few questions you should ask before signing.

✓ What’s the deposit for the rental? When is it owed, and when is it refunded? Are there any special circumstances under which it can be kept?

✓ Is there a damage waiver? More travelers today will find damage waivers as an alternative or add-on to the traditional security deposit. The damage waiver is a non-refundable fee that protects you from being charged for any accidental damage to the property up to a certain dollar limit. Each of these options will be detailed in the rental agreement.

✓ What’s the cleaning fee? Cleaning fees can vary as widely as vacation rental properties do, so there’s not an average fee travelers can come to expect. Since property sizes can range from studio suites to homes with upwards of 20 bedrooms, the cost will be relative to the size of the rental or the number of rooms.

✓ Are there any taxes? If taxes are not required for your rental, it could be a red flag that the rental is not licensed or approved for short-term rental. Lodging taxes are typically collected in line with local regulations, so each reservation will be different, as it varies from state to state and even company to company. Some states allow for tax-inclusive rates, so be sure to ask what the total tax rate will be for your stay and whether it’s included in the price you’ve been quoted. Travelers should plan to pay standard sales and bed taxes, which are dictated by the county where the property resides.

✓ How about pets? If you’re thinking of bringing Rover on vacation, check the fine print in your contract first. You may not be able to, or you may have to pay a hefty cleaning fee for the privilege, even if your furry friend stays outside. Or you may lose your entire deposit for violating your contract.

✓ Am I old enough? Some vacation rentals refuse to do business with anyone under 25 — even if they’re responsible 25-year-olds with jobs and mortgages. Spring Break ruined it for everyone! (Unfortunately, in the United States, federal law allows landlords to turn you down for a rental based on your age.)

✓ Is there a minimum length of stay? During peak season or holidays, most rentals require that you stay at least a week. You can find especially great two- or three-night stays during off-season, when booking last minute or even in specific rental properties. Other areas have ordinances banning short-term rentals. If you’re not planning to stay that long, you may need to look for a hotel. Occasionally it will be a better value if you book the minimum stay and leave when you need to. The nightly rate is easily compared to a hotel’s.

This listing looks too good to be true. Is it?

A vacation rental listing may be legit in the sense that it exists, but how can you tell if it is what it says it is? Online reviews and testimonials can help, but remember — those can be doctored and manipulated. Sometimes you can ferret out a fake by reading the property description carefully.

Do the photos look like they’re right outta Architectural Digest? Do they use wide-angle lenses or angles that make the home appear as if it’s the only house on the beach? Are the interior shots over-staged? These could be signs that the property owner is trying to make the home look better than it actually is. Then again, the property could live up to its billing. If possible cross-check it on Google Maps, and use the “street view” option, which may give you a better idea of what the rental looks like.

Is the description too wordy? Look for a clear, no-nonsense, description of the property. If it takes two paragraphs to tell you how many bedrooms and bathrooms the home offers, and another paragraph to inform you there’s a pool, then you could be in trouble. (See “What do they really mean?”)

Are they using too many superlatives? Most owners and managers are too smart to call their property the “best” property in the area that’s “perfect” for your next vacation, but look for other embellishments that may or may not be true. Trigger words include: convenient, spacious, relaxing, and well-appointed. When a property claims to be “centrally-located”, and a map shows it to be miles out of town — don’t walk, run!

What do they really mean?

Property descriptions can predict the actual experience. But mind the buzzwords! The vacation rental industry sometimes uses the same tired phrases to describe its product, and just seeing these words in a property description makes me suspicious, because they’re so cliched. Here’s how I interpret them:

Classic – Like staying at Grandma’s, only you pay for it.
Clean – But the rest of the neighborhood is chaos.
Cozy – It’s a closet.
Inviting – Takes a good picture, but nothing works.
Private – You’ll never find it.
Romantic – Kids not welcome.
Rustic – No sign of civilization.
Secure – It’s in a bad neighborhood.
Warm – The AC doesn’t always work.

AFTER YOU RENT

How do I resolve a dispute with a vacation rental owner or property manager?

Disagreements over rental homes can quickly deteriorate into nasty, personal fights that spill over to social media. You don’t want that to happen, and chances are, neither does the rental owner. With a vacation rental, there are a few strategies to consider:

Real time is better than later. Minor problems such as a TV that doesn’t work, or a refrigerator that isn’t making crushed ice, can and should be addressed then and there, not after you return from your vacation. The property owner or manager has more options, including fixing the problem (obviously,) or knocking a few dollars off your bill. If you’ve rented from a large management company, you have some added assurance – they are typically on-site or nearby to handle any issues or to pay for repair costs. If needed, a company may have dozens if not hundreds of other properties available. In an emergency breakdown situation, the management company may be able to transfer you to another of their listed properties. Don’t count on this, however, in peak season. Note: Some “by owner” rentals are also nearby.

Your rental contract is your friend. Just like the airline contract of carriage, or the cruise ticket contract, you’ll want to refer to the actual agreement when you have a major complaint. If you’ve read it before you rented (you did read it, didn’t you?) then you know what your rights are, and can make an informed argument.

State and local ordinances apply. You don’t have to be a lawyer to look up State lodging laws, and to consult any local rules that apply to your rental. Generally, State lodging laws favor the innkeeper, and local ordinances rarely if ever apply to a customer-service problem. However, citing a law that may apply underscores your seriousness, and may eliminate a trip back to your destination to visit small claims court.

Be. Extra. Nice. Whether you’re dealing with a vacation rental professional or an owner, it matters not. Remember, this is someone’s home. They’re bound to take your displeasure personally. Politeness has never been more important to you — or more helpful.

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