It happened this morning.

The battery on our Honda Accord died — a battery we bought through AAA less than three years ago. I tried to call AAA Emergency Roadside Services for help, but after navigating my way through a confusing menu, and enduring about five minutes of elevator music, my call was disconnected.

Then I remembered something the automated greeting had mentioned: Try sending a roadside assistance request online. I hadn’t thought of that. And I won’t bury the lede here — it worked like a charm.

An AAA truck arrived almost a full hour ahead of schedule and a technician replaced the battery at no cost. He explained that the battery we’d bought through AAA had a tendency to fail almost three years to the day after it was installed, which was just outside its warranty period. He told us AAA now uses a battery from a different manufacturer.

I was also shocked at how easy it was to use the AAA Roadside Services page. Within two screens, I had a confirmation (see above).

In short, I’m a very happy AAA customer.

I’m not a happy customer advocate, though.

When AAA disconnects a call — in my case, it went from “hold” music to a fast-busy — it isn’t doing its customers, or itself, any favors. Calls made to Emergency Roadside Services are all important. Hanging up on one is a little bit like ignoring a 911 call.

Surely, there’s software that can prevent these kinds of accidental disconnections, which usually happen with call center volume is at its highest.

Next time I need help from AAA, I’ll go to its site. Or I’ll download its iPhone app and use it.